The Roads to Sata

!!> Reading ➻ The Roads to Sata  ➳ Author Alan Booth – Johndore.co.uk
  • Paperback
  • 304 pages
  • The Roads to Sata
  • Alan Booth
  • English
  • 16 July 2017
  • 1568361874

About the Author: Alan Booth

Alan Booth was born in London in 1946 and traveled to Japan in 1970 to study Noh theater He stayed, working as a writer and film critic, until his death from cancer in 1993.


The Roads to Sata ALAN BOOTH S CLASSIC OF MODERN TRAVEL WRITINGTraveling Only Along Small Back Roads, Alan Booth Traversed Japan S Entire Length On Foot, From Soya At The Country S Northernmost Tip, To Cape Sata In The Extreme South, Across Three Islands And Some 2,000 Miles Of Rural Japan The Roads To Sata Is His Wry, Witty, Inimitable Account Of That Prodigious Trek.Although He Was A City Person He Was Brought Up In London And Spent Most Of His Adult Life In Tokyo Booth Had An Extraordinary Ability To Capture The Feel Of Rural Japan In His Writing Throughout His Long And Arduous Trek, He Encountered A Variety Of People Who Inhabit The Japanese Countryside From Fishermen And Soldiers, To Bar Hostesses And School Teachers, To Hermits, Drunks, And Tramps His Wonderful And Often Hilarious Descriptions Of These Encounters Are The Highlights Of These Pages, Painting A Multifaceted Picture Of Japan From The Perspective Of An Outsider, But With The Knowledge Of An Insider.The Roads To Sata Is Travel Writing At Its Best, Illuminating And Disarming, Poignant Yet Hilarious, Critical But Respectful Traveling Across Japan With Alan Booth, Readers Will Enjoy The Wit And Insight Of A Uniquely Perceptive Guide, And Importantly, They Will Discover A New Face Of An Often Misunderstood Nation.

You may also like...

10 thoughts on “The Roads to Sata

  1. Maru Kun says:

    When I first visited Japan twenty five years ago children would point at me and shout Gaijin da Gaijin da Look, a foreigner A foreigner If I walked round a Kyoto temple whole classes of middle school students would crowd around to have their picture taken and practice their English I was just like a film star Of course, I didn t let it go to my head Not in the slightest.Well, 2015 is the first year Japan has seen a tourist surplus since the fiftiespeople spent money visiting When I first visited Japan twenty five years ago children would point at me and shout Gaijin da Gaijin da Look, a foreigner A foreigner If I walked round a Kyoto temple whole classes of middle school students would crowd around to have their picture taken and practice their English I was just like a film star Of course, I didn t let it go to my head Not in the slightest.Well, 2015 is the first year Japan has seen a tourist surplus since the fiftiespeople spent money visiting Japan than the Japanese spent travelling abroad It s been well over a decade since anyone pointed their finger at me and shouted Gaijin da Gaijin da I have...

  2. Daren says:

    Alan booth is British, and prior to his walk in 1977 , he had spent 7 years living in Tokyo, with his Japanese wife Having what appeared to be a very fluent use of Japanese, he decided to walk from the northern most point to the southern most point of Japan, to interact with the local people, and try to get athorough understanding of Japan.For 128 days, over 3300 kilometres, the author walked the backroads where possible and interacted with the village people He stayed mostly in ryoka Alan booth is British, and prior to his walk in 1977 , he had spent 7 years living in Tokyo, with his ...

  3. Jamie says:

    Man, it is hard to say just how much I like this book Alan Booth, seven years into his life in Japan decides to walk the length of the archipelago In the process he seems to empty himself out completely, opening himself up to the sights and smells and beer of rural Japan There is not a shred of interpretation or theorizing about What is Japan in the whole book, which just leaves you with a long series of vignettes and many, many bottles of beer The book is funny without jokes, sad witho Man, it is hard to say just how much I like this book Alan Booth, seven years into his life in Japan decides to walk the length of the archipelago In the process he seems to empty himself out completely, opening himself up to the sights and smells and beer of rural Japan There is not a shred of interpretation or theorizing about What is Japan in the whole book, which just leaves you with a long series of vignettes and many, many bottles of beer Th...

  4. Brian says:

    One of my least favorite parts of popular writing about Japan is how the same tired tropes keep coming up over and over again It s either how Japan is a paradise of harmony with nature and ancient traditions in the modern age, with plenty of references to wabi sabi and mono no aware and geisha and kami and sakura, or how Japan is crazy and weird, with references to dakimakura and soushoku danshi and Kanamara Matsuri and hostess bars and low birthrates It is to The Roads to Sata s eternal credi One of my least favorite parts of popular writing about Japan is how the same tired tropes keep coming up over and over again It s either how Japan is a paradise of harmony with nature and ancient traditions in the modern age, with plenty of references to wabi sabi and mono no aware and geisha and kami and sakura, or how Japan is crazy and weird, with references to dakimakura and soushoku danshi and Kanamara Matsuri and hostess bars and low birthrates It is to The Roads to Sata s eternal credit that Booth avoids both of these extre...

  5. Ms. Smartarse says:

    In the 1970s, Alan Booth has decided to go on an adventure Though it may not have seemed as magical as Bilbo s, people s reaction to it was just as exasperating It s not every day, that you encounter someone traversing your country on foot from Japan s northernmost Cape Soya to its southernmost point Cape Sata.I wasn t sure what to expect, which is why I have shelved it under travel guide The Roads to Sata is much closer to a memoir, however which is good and not so good The upside In the 1970s, Alan Booth has decided to go on an adventure Though it may not have seemed as magical as Bilbo s, people s reaction to it was just as exasperating It s not every day, that you encounter someone traversing your country on foot from Japan s northernmost Cape Soya to its southernmost point Cape Sata.I wasn t sure what to expect, which is why I have shelved it under travel guide The Roads to Sata is much closer to a memoir, however which is good and not so good The upside are the partial area maps shown at the beginning of each chapter The downside is that I often found it necessary to google pictures of the places being mentioned Yes I like pretty pictures, shoot me just please wait till AFTER I visited Japan.I don t normally do auto biographies Try as I might, they generally end up boring me t...

  6. Domhnall says:

    This is the account of an Englishman s somewhat unromantic walk from the most northerly tip of Japan to its southernmost extremity, a 2000 mile journey along the Western coastline, punctuated by a myriad of incidents, encounters and anecdotes Seven years of life in Tokyo had equipped Alan Booth with fluent Japanese, an ability to eat raw fish and a confident mastery of the sandals worn in Japanese toilets, but at no point in his journey was he ever other than a gaijin a foreigner to the p This is the account of an Englishman s somewhat unromantic walk from the most northerly tip of Japan to its southernmost extremity, a 2000 mile journey along the Western coastline, punctuated by a myriad of incidents, encounters and anecdotes Seven years of life in Tokyo had equipped Alan Booth with fluent Japanese, an ability to eat raw fish and a confident mastery of the sandals worn in Japanese toilets, but at no point in his journey was he ever other than a gaijin a foreigner to the people he met The book is a hypnotic read, despite the utter absence of any plot or story, a patient passage through one location after another, for which most merit only a few pithy lines and nonethan a few pages There are descriptive passages, there are brief his...

  7. Myridian says:

    Booth quickly became a tiresome traveling companion He seemed annoyed through much of the trip and I started to feel like the main point of this book was to complain About how he was a spectacle to children, businessmen, and Japanese people in general Let s ignore the fact that he was the one who cho...

  8. Kay says:

    An introspective travelogue, focusedon the inner than outer journey my favorite kind of travelogue, in fact Booth walked from the northernmost to the southernmost points in Japan, a trek of some 2,000 miles Although he spoke fluent Japanese, he found that the perceptions especially in rural areas of his foreignness created almost an invisible barrier Still, there were times when he transcended cultural perceptions and had amazing encounters Rather episodic by nature, Booth s obs An introspective travelogue, focusedon the inner than outer journey my favorite kind of travelogue, in fact Booth walked from the northernmost to the southernmost points in Japan, a trek of some 2,000 miles Although he spoke fluent Japanese, he found that the perceptions especially in rural areas of his foreignness created almost an invisible barrier Still, there were times when he transcended cultural perceptions and had amazing encounters Rather episodic by nature, Booth s observations and insights never pall There s humor, here, too, particularly as many of the Japanese assumed he spoke no Japanese, and so were rather unbuttoned in their remarks made in his presence One especially ripe scene takes place in a ryokan The owner insists that he can t accommodate Booth because he Booth doesn t speak Japanese but, of course, the conversation is taking place i...

  9. jen says:

    I was just thinking about this book again recently, and looking back I see I never wrote a review There was so much that I loved about this account of a walk from one tip of Japan to the other The author set out walking and reported what he saw, the good and the bad Mostly he was walking through rural areas that you never hear...

  10. Josie says:

    I read this book in the hopes of becoming enthusiastic about an unwilling move to Japan I was hoping to learn about the culture and some out of the way sights Unfortunately, this book was about a man walking along roads, with no particular interest in sights Entirely readable and thoroughly depressing I learned that the Japanese litter, there are an awful lot of snakes in Japan Also an awful lot of racism...