Food Not Lawns

<Reading> ➷ Food Not Lawns  Author Heather Flores – Johndore.co.uk
  • Paperback
  • 334 pages
  • Food Not Lawns
  • Heather Flores
  • English
  • 19 May 2017
  • 193339207X

About the Author: Heather Flores

Is a well-known author, some of his books are a fascination for readers like in the Food Not Lawns book, this is one of the most wanted Heather Flores author readers around the world.


Food Not Lawns Gardening Can Be A Political Act Creativity, Fulfillment, Connection, Revolution It All Begins When We Get Our Hands In The DirtFood Not Lawns Combines Practical Wisdom On Ecological Design And Community Building With A Fresh, Green Perspective On An Age Old Subject Activist And Urban Gardener Heather Flores Shares Her Nine Step Permaculture Design To Help Farmsteaders And City Dwellers Alike Build Fertile Soil, Promote Biodiversity, And Increase Natural Habitat In Their Own Paradise Gardens But Food Not Lawns Doesn T Begin And End In The Seed Bed This Joyful Permaculture Lifestyle Manual Inspires Readers To Apply The Principles Of The Paradise Garden Simplicity, Resourcefulness, Creativity, Mindfulness, And Community To All Aspects Of Life Plant Guerilla Gardens In Barren Intersections And Medians Organize Community Meals Start A Street Theater Troupe Or Host A Local Art Swap Free Your Kitchen From Refrigeration And Enjoy Truly Fresh, Nourishing Foods From Your Own Plot Of Land Work With Children To Create Garden Play SpacesFlores Cares Passionately About The Damaged State Of Our Environment And The Ills Of Our Throwaway Society In Food Not Lawns, She Shows Us How To Reclaim The Earth One Garden At A Time

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10 thoughts on “Food Not Lawns

  1. Erica says:

    To my horror, I found that science is not only under attack by the conservative right, but by the liberal hippie left shudder This book had the potential to be useful and informative but when the author states, urine is totally sterile In the garden fresh urine can be diluted 1 10 with water and poured on the soil or compost pile she is just plain wrong Sure, urine is totally sterile if you remove it from yourself using a catheter As soon as urine passes through the urethral area it To my horror, I found that science is not only under attack by the conservative right, but by the liberal hippie left shudder This book had the potential to be useful and informative but when the author states, urine is totally sterile In the garden fresh urine can be diluted 1 10 with water and poured on the soil or compost pile she is just plain wrong Sure, urine is totally sterile if you remove it from yourself using a catheter As soon as urine passes through the urethral area it picks up tons of bacteria Delivering misinformation to your readers is dangerous and plain wrong My other favorite gem from this book is included in the Jail Support and Solidarity section Use your time in jail to talk with other prisoners about organic food, sharing resources, and ecological community But watch out for informants and undercover agents I think this certifies the author as being a complete nutso

  2. Jeffrey says:

    wrote this for www.greenprophet.com I finished reading Food Not Lawns on my roof, just after I checked my new vermi compost bin The roof compost represents my attempted adaptation to life in the modern world whereby I try and lead asustainable lifestyle within my means and ability in our modern world I was hoping to read Flores book and gain tips on how to build and maintain an edible yard in my future home, and possibly how to manage to grow edibles in the most unlikely of places li wrote this for www.greenprophet.com I finished reading Food Not Lawns on my roof, just after I checked my new vermi compost bin The roof compost represents my attempted adaptation to life in the modern world whereby I try and lead asustainable lifestyle within my means and ability in our modern world I was hoping to read Flores book and gain tips on how to build and maintain an edible yard in my future home, and possibly how to manage to grow edibles in the most unlikely of places like a concrete wasteland in Tel Aviv As it turns out, I was in for a bit of a surprise Flores sets out to write two books the first on how to convert one s lawn into a garden and thereby live aecological life replete with sweet anecdotes and exercises like planting one s self in their own garden and the second on how to reject modernity and reclaim our land, government and culture from post industrial life I ll begin with her first book Flores is clearly an accomplished landscape designer and permaculturist, though her writing is a bit dry She starts each chapter with a brief, somewhat vague meditation on the state of our modern world In this modern age of fast paced electronic consumerism and global violence many people have lost touch with their natural instincts, she writes in a typical lament of society The average person in the United States knows over a thousand corporate logos but only ten species of plants The book really shines once it revels in the details of how to build a thoughtful and effective garden The tips that stick out in my mind are how to build effective gray water systems which reuse sink and shower water in the garden Slime monsters can be built to purify your reused water by building a mini ecosystem in a reused plastic half barrel replete with woodchips, soil and plants Thus, water can flow from your sink to the slime monster to the irrigation channels that will water your garden Flores also explains composting and principles of biodynamic farming, and perhaps most fascinating, how to brew compost tea to use instead of buying expensive fertilizers really just put compost in a sock and stick in a barrel of water like you would a tea bag and use a pump to agitate the brew for 24 hours The book also includes important lists on which plants to consider planting and how to choose one s own gardening goals and how to select for plant life to match those goals Armed with information and useful tips from her chapters on the water cycle, soil, plants and polycultures, seed stewardship and ecological design, I felt ready and eager to begin laying my own garden plans If you want to garden you have to get dirty, Flores reminds the readers, and I was ready Replacing our wasteful and preposterous lawn culture, for which Americans devote a significant amount of their water supply, I felt, is a wonderful way of adapting and improving our interaction with modern life Plus, gardening is an integral part of a healthy lifestyle, a point Flores stresses over and over again She reminds readers to love your hammock as you do your pitchfork Flores write nicely about the importance of polyculture and diversity in one s garden and articulately criticizes monocultures in America She warns, don t base your food security on just one, two or even fifty species, and proceeds to offer ideas for how to save your own seeds and exchange seeds with other gardeners Surprisingly Flores hardly devotes any time to the fascinating history of lawn mono culture in America that has been written about both by Michael Pollan in Second Nature andrecently by Elizabeth Kolbert in the New Yorker It was a disappointing omission, and just proclaiming that it s time to reclaim our lawn didn t quite cut it in my opinion In fact, Flores book quickly veers from an ecological how to into a treatise on ecological activism Flores comes out of an anarchist tradition, and as a former Greenpeace activist and founder of the non profit organization Food Not Bombs, her activism is well known in various environmental circles In her book she suggests that ripping up concrete and asphalt to make room for edible gardens is in itself a form of activism, a protest against the modern system, which on its own is a nice thought.Although she isn t interested in reaching millions of people by convincing them to take the source of so much waste and pollution our lawns and alternatively converting them into abundant sources of food for our families and community rather, Flores goes one step further and proscribes how to live the most ecologically sensitive existence, suggesting quitting jobs, getting rid of clocks, mirrors, alarms and engaging in radical community action I actually agree with her on certain ideological levels, but for a host of practical reasons I think she misses the mark For starters, without jobs most people can t afford homes or lawns in the first place Secondly, I believe that striving to adapt the modern world to our environmental needs isrealistic and beneficial to a majority of the world than foolishly hoping that millions of Americans will suddenly throw out their watches and begin living a fully subsistent agrarian lifestyle I was left with the thought that Flores has existed too far outside of the mainstream to be a relevant voice on just how to make modern lifesustainable I think Flores officially loses me by chapter 9, Into the Community, in which she provides advice on protests and demonstrations Sometimes even a small demonstration can quickly become violent, usually in my experience as a result of police overreaction to civil unrest, she writes In just a few minutes things can get really crazy and a lot of people can get arrested, beaten tear gassed, and sometimes killed by police Aren t we talking about gardening She continues to offer advice on activist training camps to learn how best to prepare for civil disobedience.The book then continues on for threechapters on community organizing and how to run an effective meeting and how to teach gardening to children Her book strays considerably from what I presumed it to be about Somehow she also finds room to offer advice on scrapbook making and how to throw a party Yet, in the section on composting Flores writes that there s not enough room to explain vermi composting in detail and that the reader should read other books to attain such information.At the end of the book it became clear to me that I had just read a cultural manifesto, a how to guide on radical activism and living in the fray, in which reclaiming land to grow food is just one way to defy the mainstream When I have a house with land I will certainly use Food Not Lawns to plan my garden and gray water system, and the book will be a vital resource for me I would recommend this book to those who see their sustainable living as radical activism which sometimes includes me , but for those aspiring gardeners, I d peruse the gardening section at your local book store for something a bit , well, useful

  3. Inder says:

    I just pulled this out recently for inspiration, and I gotta say, it s really inspiring Sure, okay, it s a bit hippy dippy, but doesn t our world need a fewguerilla gardeners This book inspires me to make good use of my land, to beadventurous with my gardening, and to see gardens as potential community builders Let me tell you, my neighborhood needsof that I m seriously considering sneaking a few veggies into the abandoned lot across the street What can I lose But be awar I just pulled this out recently for inspiration, and I gotta say, it s really inspiring Sure, okay, it s a bit hippy dippy, but doesn t our world need a fewguerilla gardeners This book inspires me to make good use of my land, to beadventurous with my gardening, and to see gardens as potential community builders Let me tell you, my neighborhood needsof that I m seriously considering sneaking a few veggies into the abandoned lot across the street What can I lose But be aware, this is WAYthan a book about gardening vegetables This is a manifesto for simple living in the truest, sparest sense , green living, and activism Such topics as dumpster diving and local protests are covered in detail At first, this was definitely a turn off for me I m sensitive to the slightest bit of self righteous tone , but I do actually agree with much of what the author has to say, and there are some tips here I can incorporate into my life without entirely losing my fashion sense, or my pampered lifestyle._______________________________________I ve been dabbling in this book for some time, and it s full of helpful tips Especially, I m excited to try some of the mulching techniques when we finally get around to removing the slab of concrete that is our front yard The tone is hippy dippy at times many chapters are best skimmed but there are some great ideas here if you re willing to hunt around for them

  4. Sarah says:

    If I ever get out of cover crop phase of my backyard garden plans, God Help any of you who don t like vegetables.

  5. Dioscita says:

    This book, for me, was enh.I skimmed a lot of this book because much of it was familiar, a repeat of what I ve read in the rather copious SOLE sustainable, organic, local, ethical reading I ve done in my day There s a bit of hippy dippy, self righteous, holier than thou stuff from Flores that got a little old after a while I was particularly irritated at her carbon footprint section because I thought, Well, cool for you, Ms Flores And if everybody did the same things you do no refr This book, for me, was enh.I skimmed a lot of this book because much of it was familiar, a repeat of what I ve read in the rather copious SOLE sustainable, organic, local, ethical reading I ve done in my day There s a bit of hippy dippy, self righteous, holier than thou stuff from Flores that got a little old after a while I was particularly irritated at her carbon footprint section because I thought, Well, cool for you, Ms Flores And if everybody did the same things you do no refrigerator, no car, etc , then you re right, we d be better off The thing is, people DON T do what you do so ya got any other ideas Like all books, this one had some good moments But overall I found myself aching for some of the information I really wanted i.e there isn t a single word in there about garden varmints and skipping past a lot of the stuff I didn t If you still want to read this, I suggest getting a library copy, first

  6. Meredith says:

    while this isn t the most in depth or scholarly approach to permaculture, it is a radical treatise on getting out of the industrial food and water system, getting back in touch with the earth, setting up an ecologically sound garden and home water system, and finding ways to pass this wisdom on to your community there are a lot of great ideas and a fabulous resource section at the end of the book in this basic introduction to permaculture while the book is primarily geared toward urban envir while this isn t the most in depth or scholarly approach to permaculture, it is a radical treatise on getting out of the industrial food and water system, getting back in touch with the earth, setting up an ecologically sound garden and home water system, and finding ways to pass this wisdom on to your community there are a lot of great ideas and a fabulous resource section at the end of the book in this basic introduction to permaculture while the book is primarily geared toward urban environments people living in the country may find some sections of this book not as relevant or urgent to their permaculture needs, such as the chapter focused on getting off of city provided water , there is much here of value for any current or would be gardener who is interested in apersonal and sustainable way to provide food and water for your family, friends, and community

  7. Dianna says:

    This book has some good ideas and how tos for transforming your yard into a garden.However, 75% of the book is activist propaganda While I think that a lot of what she has to say is fine yes, I do think grass is a waste of space , she is so unreasonable about it all While I do intend to attempt to growfood on my own land, you won t catch me practicing guerrilla gardening or planting and watering my friend in my garden or starting my own local chapter of Food Not Bombs Nor am I going This book has some good ideas and how tos for transforming your yard into a garden.However, 75% of the book is activist propaganda While I think that a lot of what she has to say is fine yes, I do think grass is a waste of space , she is so unreasonable about it all While I do intend to attempt to growfood on my own land, you won t catch me practicing guerrilla gardening or planting and watering my friend in my garden or starting my own local chapter of Food Not Bombs Nor am I going to get rid of my refrigerator I ended up skipping over quite a bit of this book because its extremism was not helpful to me If Ms Flores adopted areasonable, moderate approach I would haverespect for this book

  8. Sarah says:

    Now I am pretty crunchy granola according to my friends I compost, garden, eat little meat, raise chickens for eggs, cook from scratch, recycle, conseve energy, drive carefully, care about where my food is coming from blah, blah, blah This book is all about those things andand how to do them, but it s all phrased in a preachy holier than thou, hippie propaganda manner Some funny lines, but overall it was too touchy feely, group think for my tastes.

  9. Amanda says:

    I can get into hippy dippy crap, but this chick is WACKED I own the book, much to my dismay, and there are about four useful suggestions, a lot of extreme lifestyle suggestions, and, I shit you not, magic suggestions.It reads like the rantings of a manic psych patient, and yes, I can state that from experience.

  10. Charlie says:

    Here s a book review I wrote for www.matterdaily.org Food Not Lawns How to Turn Your Yard into a Garden and Your Neighborhood into a CommunityBy H.C FloresReviewed by Charlie MaloneWednesday, 15 September 2010Food Not LawnsH.C Flores writes, the Natural world is in deep decline due to the grossly unsustainable habits of humankind This is no secret If you ve a propensity for subversion, if you ve time and passion to organize your community, Food Not Lawns offers factual, pragmatic, and ideo Here s a book review I wrote for www.matterdaily.org Food Not Lawns How to Turn Your Yard into a Garden and Your Neighborhood into a CommunityBy H.C FloresReviewed by Charlie MaloneWednesday, 15 September 2010Food Not LawnsH.C Flores writes, the Natural world is in deep decline due to the grossly unsustainable habits of humankind This is no secret If you ve a propensity for subversion, if you ve time and passion to organize your community, Food Not Lawns offers factual, pragmatic, and ideological support If you just want to grow food organically you ll also find a whole systems approach to gardening including great suggestions for water, soil, and seed conservation.Food Not Lawns isthan a how to Flores s radical, holistic thinking suggests everything from graywater systems and dumpster diving to a daily stretch routine Some practices might make you uncomfortable Modern introverts will shy away from the responsibility to community that Flores argues goes hand in hand with working in yards or window boxes Still, there s a supply of practical tips for healthy, harmonious living.If you re not committed to her cause, you ll find it impossible to forget that Flores vision of urban gardening is equal parts yard work and social activity Not carrying the practice and produce to your neighbors leaves the cycle incomplete Flores tries to convince us that failure to change will result in our extinction Whether you accept the gravity of this assertion or not, Food Not Lawns contains a wealth of information Her purpose, met with clear language and simple instruction, is to help anyone choosing an organic lifestyle to apply these ethics to our diets, our gardens, our homes, and our communities