The Mystery of the Periodic Table

[Download] ➼ The Mystery of the Periodic Table  ➻ Benjamin Wiker – Johndore.co.uk
  • Paperback
  • 165 pages
  • The Mystery of the Periodic Table
  • Benjamin Wiker
  • 18 March 2017
  • 188393771X

About the Author: Benjamin Wiker

Is a well-known author, some of his books are a fascination for readers like in the The Mystery of the Periodic Table book, this is one of the most wanted Benjamin Wiker author readers around the world.


The Mystery of the Periodic Table Leads The Reader On A Delightful And Absorbing Journey Through The Ages, On The Trail Of The Elements Of The Periodic Table As We Know Them Today He Introduces The Young Reader To People Like Von Helmont, Boyle, Stahl, Priestly, Cavendish, Lavoisier, And Many Others, All Incredibly Diverse In Personality And Approach, Who Have Laid The Groundwork For A Search That Is Still Unfolding To This Day The First Part Of Wiker S Witty And Solidly Instructive Presentation Is Most Suitable To Middle School Age, While The Later Chapters Are Designed For Ages And Up, With A Final Chapter Somewhat Advanced Illustrated By Jeanne Bendick And Ted Schluenderfritz

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10 thoughts on “The Mystery of the Periodic Table

  1. booklady says:

    Now you have to understand Chemistry was like my least favorite subject ever in school Not big on Science of any sort, Chemistry was the worst of all This week I was cleaning out our back room and going through old homeschooling books and papers When I found The Mystery of the Periodic Table I couldn t remember ever having read it The back book cover reads, written for middle school age, with later chapters designed for ages 12 13 and up Yours truly is the and up Benjamin D Walker has Now you have to understand Chemistry was like my least favorite subject ever in school Not big on Science of any sort, Chemistry was the worst of all This week I was cleaning out our back room and going through old homeschooling books and papers When I found The Mystery of the Periodic Table I couldn t remember ever having read it The back book cover reads, written for middle school age, with later chapters designed for ages 12 13 and up Yours truly is the and up Benjamin D Walker has taken the Periodic Table as we know it today and proposed the question, How did this come about Good question Kind of like the Bible, it wasn t just dropped down from the sky ready made It took centuries and the combined efforts of many people from all over the world working together and even sometimes against each other to produce the finished result This book is part science, part history, which made itpalatable for someone like me I still can t say I got all of it, but I learned quite a bit and enjoyed the journey not bad for someone who never liked Chemistry I m wrapping this copy up for my chemical engineer daughter for Christmas She gets her brains from her father

  2. Elizabeth Gardner Johnson says:

    After reading this book I feel I was ripped off in high school chemistry Text books have such a way of stripping all of the interesting history and facts out of every single subject This opened up a whole new world of interest in the elements and chemistry in general for me I loved reading about the processes and experiments done over the ages that led to the creation of our modern periodic table Based on the best observable evidence, ancient writers such as Aristotle and Democritus put fort After reading this book I feel I was ripped off in high school chemistry Text books have such a way of stripping all of the interesting history and facts out of every single subject This opened up a whole new world of interest in the elements and chemistry in general for me I loved reading about the processes and experiments done over the ages that led to the creation of our modern periodic table Based on the best observable evidence, ancient writers such as Aristotle and Democritus put forth theories that we may laugh at now, but I wonder how often future scientists will be scratching their heads and laughing at us for our modern scientific muddles Adding men of history such as Humphrey Davy, Cavendish, Lavoisier, Rutherford, etc along with the story with their successes and failures in advancing knowledge about the atomic world was a delight

  3. Marsha B says:

    I appreciate the peek into the window of chemistry this book allowed us The stories told reinforce the fact that science is an ongoing field of study Many have put their lives into what has thus far been discovered, and even the ones that got things wrong greatly contributed to what became the Periodic Table that we know I think that may be what I appreciate most failures of one became a stepping stone or ladder rung for the success of others and their humility through discovery made it al I appreciate the peek into the window of chemistry this book allowed us The stories told reinforce the fact that science is an ongoing field of study Many have put their lives into what has thus far been discovered, and even the ones that got things wrong greatly contributed to what became the Periodic Table that we know I think that may be what I appreciate most failures of one became a stepping stone or ladder rung for the success of others and their humility through discovery made it all possible

  4. Cristina Montes says:

    Who would have thought that the history of the periodic table of elements could be presented in a compelling and understandable way, such that I was not able to put down the book

  5. Brian says:

    A very solid book from an inconspicuous Christian company, with a very subtle and not at all overplayed theme that scientists are often wrong when they make a breakthrough As a layman, I appreciate this.

  6. Vanessa says:

    I love that there is a Spoilers button here Guess what Mendeleev did it, but with lots of accomplices, including one or two after the fact I thought I was going to skim this book to evaluate it for my 9th grader who is taking Chemistry this year But I couldn t skim I had to read the whole thing Bad news is it added a week to my planned homeschool curriculum because I now want him to read the whole thing, too This book is wonderful.Other homeschool parents as we read, we re replicating I love that there is a Spoilers button here Guess what Mendeleev did it, but with lots of accomplices, including one or two after the fact I thought I was going to skim this book to evaluate it for my 9th grader who is taking Chemistry this year But I couldn t skim I had to read the whole thing Bad news is it added a week to my planned homeschool curriculum because I now want him to read the whole thing, too This book is wonderful.Other homeschool parents as we read, we re replicating some of the labs in chronological order I want him to have a good foundation of how we got to modern chemistry So many texts START with the periodic table, which to me is almost criminal.Joseph Black s 1761 experiment with the rising temperature of water as it starts to boil is a great introduction to lab equipment and patient observation Cavendish s 1776 experiment where he isolated inflammable air hydrogen is a great intro to lab safety and how to write lab reports And you make water

  7. meme says:

    This book leads the reader on a delightful and absorbing journey through the ages, on the trail of the elements of the Periodic Table as we know them today Introduces people like Von Helmont, Boyle, Stahl, Priestly, Cavendish, Lavoisier, and many others, all incredibly diverse in personality and approach, who have laid the groundwork for a search that is still unfolding today.The first part of the book is most suitable for 10 , while the later chapters are designed for ages 12 13 and up, with a This book leads the reader on a delightful and absorbing journey through the ages, on the trail of the elements of the Periodic Table as we know them today Introduces people like Von Helmont, Boyle, Stahl, Priestly, Cavendish, Lavoisier, and many others, all incredibly diverse in personality and approach, who have laid the groundwork for a search that is still unfolding today.The first part of the book is most suitable for 10 , while the later chapters are designed for ages 12 13 and up, with a final chapter that is somewhatadvanced People who have never taken chemistry will find the book very helpful There s loads of interesting information Book reports or chapter assignments can come from this book

  8. Cindy Dyson Eitelman says:

    More like what I wanted The Disappearing Spoon to be but still not what I wanted This one was much shorter and better organized I closed it feeling like I d learned a bit And I was entertained, which is the real reason I read these sort of books If I wanted to learn chemistry I d pick up a textbook.That sounded sarcastic but really wasn t a well written textbook can be eminently readable And so was this And I now remember what an isotope is.It s a pretty good history and recommended for More like what I wanted The Disappearing Spoon to be but still not what I wanted This one was much shorter and better organized I closed it feeling like I d learned a bit And I was entertained, which is the real reason I read these sort of books If I wanted to learn chemistry I d pick up a textbook.That sounded sarcastic but really wasn t a well written textbook can be eminently readable And so was this And I now remember what an isotope is.It s a pretty good history and recommended for budding young chemists who want to go back and see how we figured all this out Definitely a sokay

  9. Ellen says:

    The Mystery of the Periodic Table ended up being an interesting blend of 2 parts history, 1 part biography, and all chemistry It takes the reader from the earliest days of metalwork through alchemy and all the disproven theories of early chemists right up to Mendeleev s periodic table as we know it today It is marketed as being a middle school aged book, and although I think some of the chemical equations go over my own students heads a bit, there s still something there for them to get out o The Mystery of the Periodic Table ended up being an interesting blend of 2 parts history, 1 part biography, and all chemistry It takes the reader from the earliest days of metalwork through alchemy and all the disproven theories of early chemists right up to Mendeleev s periodic table as we know it today It is marketed as being a middle school aged book, and although I think some of the chemical equations go over my own students heads a bit, there s still something there for them to get out of it It s a worthy addition to a science library

  10. Hannah says:

    I can t believe I hadn t added this yet I read The Mystery of the Periodic Table in my junior year, and loved it It was understandable and,than that, enjoyable This book helped me get excited about chemistry, so that I would go around telling my siblings about the fascinating elements of the world.