The Periodic Table

[Reading] ➸ The Periodic Table  By Eric Scerri – Johndore.co.uk
  • Hardcover
  • 346 pages
  • The Periodic Table
  • Eric Scerri
  • English
  • 02 May 2019
  • 0195305736

About the Author: Eric Scerri

Is a well-known author, some of his books are a fascination for readers like in the The Periodic Table book, this is one of the most wanted Eric Scerri author readers around the world.


The Periodic Table The Periodic Table Is One Of The Most Potent Icons In Science It Lies At The Core Of Chemistry And Embodies The Most Fundamental Principles Of The Field The One Definitive Text On The Development Of The Periodic Table By Van Spronsen , Has Been Out Of Print For A Considerable Time The Present Book Provides A Successor To Van Spronsen, But Goes Further In Giving An Evaluation Of The Extent To Which Modern Physics Has, Or Has Not, Explained The Periodic System The Book Is Written In A Lively Style To Appeal To Experts And Interested Lay Persons AlikeThe Periodic Table Begins With An Overview Of The Importance Of The Periodic Table And Of The Elements And It Examines The Manner In Which The Term Element Has Been Interpreted By Chemists And Philosophers The Book Then Turns To A Systematic Account Of The Early Developments That Led To The Classification Of The Elements Including The Work Of Lavoisier, Boyle And Dalton And Cannizzaro The Precursors To The Periodic System, Like Dobereiner And Gmelin, Are Discussed In Chapter The Discovery Of The Periodic System By Six Independent Scientists Is Examined In DetailTwo Chapters Are Devoted To The Discoveries Of Mendeleev, The Leading Discoverer, Including His Predictions Of New Elements And His Accommodation Of Already Existing Elements Chapters And Consider The Impact Of Physics Including The Discoveries Of Radioactivity And Isotopy And Successive Theories Of The Electron Including Bohr S Quantum Theoretical Approach Chapter Discusses The Response To The New Physical Theories By Chemists Such As Lewis And Bury Who Were Able To Draw On Detailed Chemical Knowledge To Correct Some Of The Early Electronic Configurations Published By Bohr And OthersChapter Provides A Critical Analysis Of The Extent To Which Modern Quantum Mechanics Is, Or Is Not, Able To Explain The Periodic System From First Principles Finally, Chapter Considers The Way That The Elements Evolved Following The Big Bang And In The Interior Of Stars The Book Closes With An Examination Of Further Chemical Aspects Including Lesser Known Trends Within The Periodic System Such As The Knight S Move Relationship And Secondary Periodicity, As Well At Attempts To Explain Such Trends

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10 thoughts on “The Periodic Table

  1. AJ says:

    If you want a history of how all of the elements were discovered, and information about each of them, then this isn t the book for you Go ahead and check out The Disappearing Spoon instead The Periodic Table doesn t focus on the individual elements but instead looks at the periodic table as a whole.I found this book interesting on many levels First, it was enlightening to read a history of the periodic table and how it evolved from individual scientists noticing patterns in atomic weights Ma If you want a history of how all of the elements were discovered, and information about each of them, then this isn t the book for you Go ahead and check out The Disappearing Spoon instead The Periodic Table doesn t focus on the individual elements but instead looks at the periodic table as a whole.I found this book interesting on many levels First, it was enlightening to read a history of the periodic table and how it evolved from individual scientists noticing patterns in atomic weights Many of the people involved were working with incorrect information, and obviously they weren t able to read the end of the book so to speak so they were really paving brand new roads along the way.Mostly I found the book interesting in its take on the philosophy of the science What does the periodic table really MEAN, and what can it tell us, about elements How have the advances in quantum physics enhanced this understanding You can tell that Scerri really has a chip on his shoulder about physics taking the credit for so many things in science, which may or may not be a valid argument I found that his constant physics put downs took away from the message of the book, which was in fact really eye opening A lot of the quantum physics that is used to explain the periodic table is based on empirical data that was based on the periodic table So it s almost like the snake that eats its own tail we have quantum physics that explains chemistry by using data derived by chemists to help explain physics Really, it s impressive how much we understand, and how little we know about atomic structure Whether or not it s up to a physicist or a chemist to make these final understandings, I don t care Honestly, it ll probably be a mixture of both groups to help us learnabout atomic structure in the long run

  2. Chris says:

    I really liked this book This one book,than any other non textbook, has convinced me that I need to change the content of my college level General Chemistry lectures There are dozens of things that I realize now that were historically inaccurate in nearly every General Chemistry book I ve ever used I would encourage every physics and chemistry teacher or professor to read this book A big thanks to Eric Scerri for writing such a well researched account of the development of the periodic I really liked this book This one book,than any other non textbook, has convinced me that I need to change the content of my college level General Chemistry lectures There are dozens of things that I realize now that were historically inaccurate in nearly every General Chemistry book I ve ever used I would encourage every physics and chemistry teacher or professor to read this book A big thanks to Eric Scerri for writing such a well researched account of the development of the periodic table

  3. Alan Earhart says:

    This is the only book in print and available that gives a comprehensive overview of the history of the organization of elements into a periodic system There are other books but they are out of print and wicked expensive to find.I recommend this to anyone teaching chemistry, getting a major minor in chemistry, or anyone really interested in the history of chemistry.

  4. Dan D& says:

    This book was intended to satisfy my craving for a good pop sci book on chemistry While there are hundreds of books covering a wide variety of topics in physics, it seems like there are relatively few books for the general reader that are about chemistry Maybe it s because, as the author of this book, Eric Scerri, argues, most people believe that chemistry ultimately reduces to physics, and quantum mechanics in particular, and so they want to go straight to the source Or maybe it s because ch This book was intended to satisfy my craving for a good pop sci book on chemistry While there are hundreds of books covering a wide variety of topics in physics, it seems like there are relatively few books for the general reader that are about chemistry Maybe it s because, as the author of this book, Eric Scerri, argues, most people believe that chemistry ultimately reduces to physics, and quantum mechanics in particular, and so they want to go straight to the source Or maybe it s because chemistry is viewed as less glamorous andantiquated than things like cutting edge particle physics and cosmology.While the periodic table, as the title suggests, is the central object of study in this book, the author covers a wide range of topics in chemistry and physics, while at the same time making fascinating arguments and observations about the history and philosophy of science Most of the book is focused on the historical development of the concept of periodicity and early versions of the periodic table Mendeleev takes center stage, but there are a wide variety of other interesting and important players in the development of the periodic table The remainder of the book discusses the interplay between chemistry and modern atomic theory, including quantum mechanics, along with some fascinating facts about the elements and periodicity.One of the central arguments is that periodicity and the properties of the elements are not entirely reducible to quantum mechanics, at least not yet To me this sounds a bit like the grumblings of a chemist with an axe to grind, and I m not sure I m entirely convinced but this can be taken with a grain of salt coming from a largely ignorant layman However, I did find the arguments and evidence to be completely fascinating, and it is certainly thought provoking to say the least The most fascinating discussions to me were those surrounding the questions about the ontological reality of the elements and chemical periodicity This was accompanied by the discussion of a rather subtle distinction between elements as basic substances and simple substances.After reading this book, I am left with the impression that chemistry is a rich and fascinating field and that the interaction between the modern fields of chemistry and physics is muchsubtle than is commonly believed Scerri observes that many people, including many chemists and physicists, believe that the periodicity and electronic structure of the elements was completely explained by Bohr with his first forays into quantum theory However, he argues, much of modern atomic theory, including the structure of atomic orbitals, was developed as the result of the careful study of chemical properties of the elements, rather than theories based on purely electronic configurations.This book is a fascinating read, and is extremely well written My only criticism, which is purely a matter of opinion, is that in some parts the content is too technical to be fully appreciated or understood at all by someone outside the field However, these technical sections were generally very brief and did not detract from the overall narrative I believe this book would be very difficult for someone who has had no previous exposure to basic concepts in modern atomic theory and quantum mechanics, though

  5. John Anthony Smith says:

    I liked how the book started with some earlier version of the periodic tables explaining what the scientists were trying to accomplish with the table, and how it over time evolved through atomic weight, to the aufbau principle to the organization structure and explained the relationships of element in the periodic table based on the knight s movement principle a nd the n,n 10 principle Found it interesting that the Unun iums were included that were just renamed to new elements in Periodic Tab I liked how the book started with some earlier version of the periodic tables explaining what the scientists were trying to accomplish with the table, and how it over time evolved through atomic weight, to the aufbau principle to the organization structure and explained the relationships of element in the periodic table based on the knight s movement principle a nd the n,n 10 principle Found it interesting that the Unun iums were included that were just renamed to new elements in Periodic Table Overall, very interesting read and very informative

  6. Nigel Stanger says:

    Interesting, but definitely not a layman s book.

  7. Elizabeth says:

    Surprisingly good Recommended for any who hasthan a passing interest in chemistry.

  8. Randell says:

    Loved it I agree it would be tough going for the non scientist.

  9. Alfredo says:

    This was a pretty good read on the history of the development of the periodic table of the elements As a person with a background in Chemistry I rather enjoyed it