Disposable People: New Slavery in the Global Economy

Disposable People: New Slavery in the Global Economy ePUB
    download books from your favorite authors on Apple books reveal how the tragic emergence Disposable People: PDF/EPUB ² of a new slavery is inextricably linked to the global economy This completely revised edition includes a new prefaceAll of the author s royalties from this book go to fund antislavery projects around the world."/>
  • Paperback
  • 298 pages
  • Disposable People: New Slavery in the Global Economy
  • Kevin Bales
  • English
  • 21 August 2018
  • 0520243846

About the Author: Kevin Bales

New Slavery MOBI ò Why I had to write Blood and Earth For years I traveled the world meeting people in slavery trying to understand the depth and truth of their lives What I saw, heard, and learned changed me, and led me deeper into the work of ending slavery, but I was missing something important Disposable People: PDF/EPUB ² Where there are slaves, the environment is under assault, forests are being destroyed, endangered species are dying, and climate change is worsening and all of this destruction is driven by profits from products we buy Children, especially, are suffering in the fish camps of Bangladesh, in the mines of Eastern Congo feeding the People: New Slavery Kindle ´ electronics industry, in mercury saturated gold pits in Ghana, and when brutally used and disposed of by criminals decimating theforest And beside the children, endangered species are being wiped out, or pressed to fight back like the protected Bengal tigers that prey on child slaves in fishing campsAfter seven years of research and travel we now know that if slavery were a country it would be the third largest producer of CO in the world after China and the USA, though its population is only the size of Canada s The scale of this joint disaster has been too big to see, until now Yet, it is precisely the role that slaves play in this ecological catastrophe that opens a new solution, one that unleashes the power of abolition to save and preserve the natural worldTo hearabout Blood and Earth tune in to NPR s Fresh Air on Tuesday January, and check out an excerpt in Scientific American HEREI m a guy that grew up in Oklahoma thinking if the whole world is as quiet as this place I better cram life to the fullest The good news the world is often muchinteresting than Oklahoma I lived a long time in London, and now live in DC For the last years all my work has been about modern slavery real slavery, not sweatshops, or bad marriages, or not being able to stop shopping Back in I published a book about contemporary slavery that changed my life It went into languages, got made into a movie, won some prizes, stuff like that Since then I ve published threebooks, and threewill come out in In Sept I published a book that is a plan for the eradication of global slavery It s called Ending Slavery How We Free Today s Slaves This is what people said about it None of us is truly free while others remain enslaved The continuing existence of slavery is one of the greatest tragedies facing our global humanity Today we finally have the means and increasingly the conviction to end this scourge and to bring millions of slaves to freedom Read Kevin Bales practical and inspiring book and you will discover how our world can be free at last Archbishop Desmond Tutu I was enslaved at age as part of a human trafficking plot I know modern slavery from the inside, and since coming to freedom I am committed to end it forever Every human life has value People have been sold for far too long and it s time to stop it This book shows us how to make a world where nochildhoods will be stolen and sold as mine was Given Kachepa, former child slave in the United States Ever since the Emancipation Proclamation, Americans have congratulated themselves on ending slavery once and for all But did we Kevin Bales is a powerful and effective voice in pointing out the appalling degree to which servitude, forced labor and outright slavery still exist in today s world, even here This book is a valuable primer on the persistence of these evils, their intricate links to poverty, corruption and globalization and what we can do to combat them He s a modern day William Lloyd Garrison Adam Hochschild, author of Bury the Chains Prophets and Rebels in the Fight to Free an Empire s SlavesHere s the other bio stuff My book Disposable People New Slavery in the Global Economy published in , was nominated for the.


Disposable People: New Slavery in the Global Economy[PDF / Epub] ✅ Disposable People: New Slavery in the Global Economy Author Kevin Bales – Johndore.co.uk Slavery is illegal throughout the world, yet than twenty seven million people are still trapped in one of history s oldest social institutions Kevin Bales s disturbing story of contemporary slavery re New Slavery MOBI ò Slavery is illegal throughout the world, yet than twenty seven million people are still trapped in one of history s oldest social institutions Kevin Bales s disturbing story of contemporary slavery reaches from Pakistan s brick kilns and Thailand s brothels to various multinational corporations His investigations reveal how the tragic emergence Disposable People: PDF/EPUB ² of a new slavery is inextricably linked to the global economy This completely revised edition includes a new prefaceAll of the author s royalties from this book go to fund antislavery projects around the world.

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10 thoughts on “Disposable People: New Slavery in the Global Economy

  1. Josephine says:

    In his book, Bales recounts how the escaped slave and abolitionist, Frederick Douglass, was invited to give a keynote speech for a large Fourth of July celebration in New York in 1852.Instead of delivering a rousing speech about the greatness of living in freedom, Douglass basically asked how we can be proud of our freedom if there were still slaves in existence And while most of us think of the word slavery in terms of something that happened a long time ago, it actually still exists today In his book, Bales recounts how the escaped slave and abolitionist, Frederick Douglass, was invited to give a keynote speech for a large Fourth of July celebration in New York in 1852.Instead of delivering a rousing speech about the greatness of living in freedom, Douglass basically asked how we can be proud of our freedom if there were still slaves in existence And while most of us think of the word slavery in terms of something that happened a long time ago, it actually still exists today it exists in Thailand where the sex industry keeps thousands of young women enslaved as prostitutes it exists in Pakistan, where bonded laborers work in furnace like heat, making bricks it exists in charcoal making camps in Brazil, where the poor are lured into debt bondage, where measly rations are often their only payment for their work.And all of it continues to exist, in part, because a lot of us don t question it.It sort of hit home for me when Bales wrote, consumers do look for bargains, and they don t usually stop to ask why a product is so cheap We have to face facts by always looking for the best deal, we may be choosing slave made goods without knowing what we are buying p 23 24

  2. Shantavia says:

    I read this book for my history class I really enjoyed the way this book was written It was writtenas a story than an information heavy textbook This book talked about how slavery still exists in our world today, just in a different form that it did in the past We explored slavery in Brazil, India, Mauritania, Pakistan, and Thailand Rating 4 5

  3. mis fit says:

    overall, bales does a good job of connecting these insanely messed up situations of new slavery with changes in the global economy the author s descriptions transport you into these horrifying worlds where people are definitely seen as disposable in that sense, i am really glad i read this and i learned a lot about what people have to deal with on a daily basis, stuff that my little woes hardly measure up to as a side note, i do worry that reading these social justice y books allows me t overall, bales does a good job of connecting these insanely messed up situations of new slavery with changes in the global economy the author s descriptions transport you into these horrifying worlds where people are definitely seen as disposable in that sense, i am really glad i read this and i learned a lot about what people have to deal with on a daily basis, stuff that my little woes hardly measure up to as a side note, i do worry that reading these social justice y books allows me to exploit other people s pain for my own self development or something like i am using them to become aknowledgeable and sensitive person, ultimately just to feel better about myself i don t want to be this way though.i can only give this book three stars because, while it is absolutely a valuable book to read and these stories really need to be heard, there were some points where i just felt like bales was too simplistic this is partly stylistic, in that he s writing to get you to do something about it, but it was a little annoying at times and maybe a little patronizing to the people in these f cked up situations

  4. Tia Malkin-fontecchio says:

    It is not without some shortcomings, but definitely a book people should read The testimony of modern day slaves should move people to action I had only two issues with the book The first is that it is in need of updating There is a new preface on the 2012 edition but that is not enough Also, as a historian I take issue with some of the distinctions he makes between the new and the old slavery Much of what he said was new, was true of slavery in Brazil during the colonial period and ev It is not without some shortcomings, but definitely a book people should read The testimony of modern day slaves should move people to action I had only two issues with the book The first is that it is in need of updating There is a new preface on the 2012 edition but that is not enough Also, as a historian I take issue with some of the distinctions he makes between the new and the old slavery Much of what he said was new, was true of slavery in Brazil during the colonial period and even 19th century He seems to have made these distinctions solely on the study of 19th century slavery in the American South

  5. Ethan Wells says:

    Disposable People New Slavery in the Global Economy presents an at times quite sobering view of the survival of what might still be called slavery in the 20th and 21st century It does so via five case histories oriented around the persistence of slavery in Thailand, Mauritania, Brazil, Pakistan and India While it is at times a helpful reminder of the enormous cruelty that continues to exist throughout the world and, correspondingly, the enormous work that remain to be done to counter it, Di Disposable People New Slavery in the Global Economy presents an at times quite sobering view of the survival of what might still be called slavery in the 20th and 21st century It does so via five case histories oriented around the persistence of slavery in Thailand, Mauritania, Brazil, Pakistan and India While it is at times a helpful reminder of the enormous cruelty that continues to exist throughout the world and, correspondingly, the enormous work that remain to be done to counter it, Disposable People ends up undermining its own message by, at times, shoddy scholarship it is simply not true that the first president of Mauritania was Charles de Gaulle s son in law 92 , and a tendency towards discrediting hyberbole Since it raises other issues of significant pertinence to Bales book, it is worth discussing one such example of hyperbole in some detail.On page 173, Bales writes that the Pakistani brick kiln owners owners who rely on bonded workers whose inability ever to repay their loans leaves them effectively enslaved used exactly the same words to justify their treatment of their workers ew I heard from racists in AlabamaYou have to understand, one told me, they re not capable of planning or saving they only live for the moment if they get a little money they just drink it up or throw it away But of course, the Pakistani brick kiln owners did not use exactly the same words In all likelihood, they didn t even use the same language While Bales point may be that they expressed similar sentiments, in their own language, as Alabama racists did in English, in his rush to find commonalities, again and again, he overlooks difference here, linguistic difference Indeed, at no point does Bales discuss, in any detail, the problem of translation, even as he appears to rely on others to mediate between him and his sources, and even as his paradigmatic notion of slavery remains based albeit through opposition on the old slavery of the Christian West It does not seem to occur to him that this model s application to different cultural and linguistic communities communities that are, for example, predominantly Buddhist, Hindu, or Muslim might be problematic No doubt Bales would insist that what he calls slavery can be identified in these different communities regardless of linguistic and cultural differences This amounts to saying that the term slavery and its corresponding lexicon is perfectly translatable across different languages, cultures, histories and so forth What makes such an article of faith so problematic, however, is that Bales own fundamental insight the one that makes his book possible in the first place is precisely that slavery never disappeared instead, it took a different form 12 If slavery has not simply disappeared but instead has taken different forms, then what would be at stake in any rigorous scholarship on the question of slavery would be its survival in its difference from itself By reducing all slavery to a paradigm a reduction that allows him to overlook the problem of translation across different languages and cultures Bales not only blinds himself to his own insight, he blinds himself to other forms of what might still be called slavery Whence his anxiety to distinguish real slavery such as what he discovers in third world countries, from the rhetorical use of the word slavery found predominantly, it seems, in the first world Yet is it in fact true that those in the United States who claim, for example, that anyone in prison is a slave xix are simply speaking rhetorically They might be speaking hyperbolically though Bales should perhaps not be the first to cast a stone here but it s certainly not sheer fiction as numerous people have pointed out in recent years, the 13th Amendment abolishing slavery in the United States does so except as punishment for a crime which is why prisoners in the United States can be forced to work for wages as farcical as any Bales discovers in Pakistan or India on the continuity between the institution of slavery and the American prison system, see Shane Bauer s American Prison A Reporter s Undercover Journey into the Business of Punishment My point, in any case, is that by insisting on a proper meaning to slavery that is applicable across different linguistic, religious and cultural communities, Bales blinds himself to the implications of his own insight, namely that what we call slavery can never simply disappear, that it will survive in different forms indefinitely, and thus that the duty and the task of contesting it, as rigorously as we can, remains forever before us Bales blindness enables his optimism he claims, in the 2004 preface to the new edition, that this could be the generation that brings slavery, after five thousand years, to an end xii but it does so at a significant price the day when slavery finally meets its end for Bales will in fact be the day he simply closes his eyes to how it merely took a different form

  6. Megan says:

    If a friend hadn t invited me to a discussion group on this book, I never would have picked it up Somehow the author managed to interview current and former slaves from Mauritania to Paris, retell their stories, contextualize the economic systems that slavery exists in, and still not get bogged down in the darkness Or maybe that s due to the discussion with other compassionate, engaged readers Overall, solid investigative journalism about a topic most people don t know exists note skim thr If a friend hadn t invited me to a discussion group on this book, I never would have picked it up Somehow the author managed to interview current and former slaves from Mauritania to Paris, retell their stories, contextualize the economic systems that slavery exists in, and still not get bogged down in the darkness Or maybe that s due to the discussion with other compassionate, engaged readers Overall, solid investigative journalism about a topic most people don t know exists note skim through the textbook style first chapter each subsequent one profiles slavery in a different country

  7. Heather says:

    I picked this up on a trip to Arkansas I got this one at the headquarters for Heifer Project International Desmond Tutu says this book is A well researched, scholarly and deeply disturbing expose of modern day slavery with well thought out strategies for what to do to combat this scourge And, you know I love me some Mr Tutu Please read this book.

  8. Erin Ergenbright says:

    You must read this book, which is enlightening and terrifying, but also talks about the specific reasons these horrors have happened, and continue to happen.

  9. Janet Harper says:

    This was researched 20 years ago, but Bales argues that the conditions for new kinds of slavery not a metaphor for being born into poverty are fueled by globalization and wealth inequality combined with other factors such as caste systems The title says it there are millions of people owned as property by others particularly girls who have no value to their families except in the sex trade Unlike women who choose prostitution or escorting, they work under the threat of violence to them a This was researched 20 years ago, but Bales argues that the conditions for new kinds of slavery not a metaphor for being born into poverty are fueled by globalization and wealth inequality combined with other factors such as caste systems The title says it there are millions of people owned as property by others particularly girls who have no value to their families except in the sex trade Unlike women who choose prostitution or escorting, they work under the threat of violence to them and their families, until they are used up and left to die of AIDS or starvation Bales strives to distinguish slavery from other evils such as child labor, by the fact of people being literally owned by the brothels These are extremely lucrative businesses often held by groups of middle class investors

  10. Heather(Gibby) says:

    I don t consider myself a na ve person, but I sure became aware of some aspects of life around the globe that I was totally in the dark about Kevin Bales walks the reader through several different types of human slavery around the globe, and outlines the difficulties encountered by anyone trying to bring about systemic change to the human rights atrocities being committed around the world this was published in 2004, so I am hopeful that some progress has been made since that time It has defin I don t consider myself a na ve person, but I sure became aware of some aspects of life around the globe that I was totally in the dark about Kevin Bales walks the reader through several different types of human slavery around the globe, and outlines the difficulties encountered by anyone trying to bring about systemic change to the human rights atrocities being committed around the world this was published in 2004, so I am hopeful that some progress has been made since that time It has definitely spurred me to do somereading