The Romantic Tavern: Literature and Conviviality in the Age of Revolution

[PDF / Epub] ⚣ The Romantic Tavern: Literature and Conviviality in the Age of Revolution ✈ Ian Newman – Johndore.co.uk
  • Hardcover
  • 298 pages
  • The Romantic Tavern: Literature and Conviviality in the Age of Revolution
  • Ian Newman
  • 10 March 2018
  • 1108470378

About the Author: Ian Newman

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The Romantic Tavern: Literature and Conviviality in the Age of RevolutionThe Tavern Is Widely Acknowledged As Central To The Cultural And Political Life Of Britain, Yet Widely Misunderstood Ian Newman Provides The First Sustained Account Of One Of The Primary Institutions Of The Late Eighteenth Century Public Sphere The Tavern Was A Venue Not Only For Serious Political And Literary Debate, But Also For Physical Pleasure The Ludic, Libidinal And Gastronomic Enjoyments With Which Late Georgian Public Life Was Inextricably Entwined This Study Focuses On The Architecture Of Taverns And The People Who Frequented Them, As Well As The Artistic Forms Drinking Songs, Ballads, Anacreontic Poetry, And Toasting With Which The Tavern Was Associated By Examining The Culture Of Conviviality That Emerged Alongside Other New Forms Of Sociability In The Second Half Of The Eighteenth Century, The Romantic Tavern Argues For The Importance Of Conviviality As A Complex New Form Of Sociability Shaped By Masculine Political Gathering And Mixed Company Entertainments

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3 thoughts on “The Romantic Tavern: Literature and Conviviality in the Age of Revolution

  1. Catherine Puma says:

    This work is a very interesting academic perspective on how taverns and the spirit of conviviality shaped culture and literature in the Romantic Period on the British Isles, especially in metropolitan London Dr Ian Newman is an Assistant Professor of English at the University of Notre Dame, and a fellow of the Keough Naughton Institute for Irish Studies, where he specializes in 18th and 19th Century British and Irish literature Newman begins by specifying that unfortunately studying tavern This work is a very interesting academic perspective on how taverns and the spirit of conviviality shaped culture and literature in the Romantic Period on the British Isles, especially in metropolitan London Dr Ian Newman is an Assistant Professor of English at the University of Notre Dame, and a fellow of the Keough Naughton Institute for Irish Studies, where he specializes in 18th and 19th Century British and Irish literature Newman begins by specifying that unfortunately studying taverns does not involve a lot of fieldwork, as most taverns from the Romantic Period are no longer standing As the influence of the tavern physical spaces is discussed, the accompanying floor plan images help to augment Newman s descriptions of building architecture and function To avoid just listing a bunch of general statements about tavern physicality contributing to how we understand the Romantic Period, Newman focuses his discussion by close reading the influence two particularly popular taverns had on this period of literary history the London Tavern and the Crown and Anchor Being previously unaware of just how important taverns were, I found the strict hierarchy in clubs taverns alehouses reputability particularly interesting The later chapters discussof how taverns mentioned in literature and literary works being performed in taverns defined the era of central conviviality personal identity Such literary importance can be seen in political ballads, proceedings from the Anacreontic Society, bawdy and lyrical ballads, as well as political speeches during the early stages of the evolution of the tradition of toasting Relevant literary and intellectual figures to convivial tavern traditions include Captain Morris, Wordsworth, Coleridge, and Sir Walter Scott This book is a part of the Cambridge University Press s Cambridge Studies in Romanticism series, with each book typically by a different expert professor discussing one aspect or another of Romantic literature and culture interpretations I really enjoyed this and I am glad I read it What a quality academic contribution to our understanding of the Romantic Period on the British Isles I can see this becoming a good accompaniment to undergraduate courses dealing with some of these topics I would recommend this work to those studying the Romantic Period, as well as fans of balladry, convivial culture, British tavern history, Wordsworth, Coleridge, and Sir Walter Scott I only give this 4 stars, however, because it would be hard to appreciate the applicability of this work without first reading some of the types of ballads and songs discussed within