Crazy Like Us

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  • Hardcover
  • 306 pages
  • Crazy Like Us
  • Ethan Watters
  • English
  • 06 September 2017
  • 141658708X

About the Author: Ethan Watters

Is a well-known author, some of his books are a fascination for readers like in the Crazy Like Us book, this is one of the most wanted Ethan Watters author readers around the world.


Crazy Like Us It Is Well Known That American Culture Is A Dominant Force At Home And Abroad Our Exportation Of Everything From Movies To Junk Food Is A Well Documented Phenomenon But Is It Possible America S Most Troubling Impact On The Globalizing World Has Yet To Be Accounted For In Crazy Like Us, Ethan Watters Reveals That The Most Devastating Consequence Of The Spread Of American Culture Has Not Been Our Golden Arches Or Our Bomb Craters But Our Bulldozing Of The Human Psyche Itself We Are In The Process Of Homogenizing The Way The World Goes Mad America Has Been The World Leader In Generating New Mental Health Treatments And Modern Theories Of The Human Psyche We Export Our Psychopharmaceuticals Packaged With The Certainty That Our Biomedical Knowledge Will Relieve The Suffering And Stigma Of Mental Illness We Categorize Disorders, Thereby Defining Mental Illness And Health, And Then Parade These Seemingly Scientific Certainties In Front Of The World The Blowback From These Efforts Is Just Now Coming To Light It Turns Out That We Have Not Only Been Changing The Way The World Talks About And Treats Mental Illness We Have Been Changing The Mental Illnesses Themselves.For Millennia, Local Beliefs In Different Cultures Have Shaped The Experience Of Mental Illness Into Endless Varieties Crazy Like Us Documents How American Interventions Have Discounted And Worked To Change Those Indigenous Beliefs, Often At A Dizzying Rate Over The Last Decades, Mental Illnesses Popularized In America Have Been Spreading Across The Globe With The Speed Of Contagious Diseases Watters Travels From China To Tanzania To Bring Home The Unsettling Conclusion That The Virus Is Us As We Introduce Americanized Ways Of Treating Mental Illnesses, We Are In Fact Spreading The Diseases.In Post Tsunami Sri Lanka, Watters Reports On The Western Trauma Counselors Who, In Their Rush To Help, Inadvertently Trampled Local Expressions Of Grief, Suffering, And Healing In Hong Kong, He Retraces The Last Steps Of The Teenager Whose Death Sparked An Epidemic Of The American Version Of Anorexia Nervosa Watters Reveals The Truth About A Multi Million Dollar Campaign By One Of The World S Biggest Drug Companies To Change The Japanese Experience Of Depression Literally Marketing The Disease Along With The Drug.But This Book Is Not Just About The Damage We Ve Caused In Faraway Places Looking At Our Impact On The Psyches Of People In Other Cultures Is A Gut Check, A Way Of Forcing Ourselves To Take A Fresh Look At Our Own Beliefs About Mental Health And Healing When We Examine Our Assumptions From A Farther Shore, We Begin To Understand How Our Own Culture Constantly Shapes And Sometimes Creates The Mental Illnesses Of Our Time By Setting Aside Our Role As The World S Therapist, We May Come To Accept That We Have As Much To Learn From Other Cultures Beliefs About The Mind As We Have To Teach.

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10 thoughts on “Crazy Like Us

  1. Thomas says:

    A wonderful book for those interested in how culture influences mental health Ethan Watters crafts a strong argument against how the western world s imperialism dismisses other people s diverse lived experiences, medicalizing their struggles in ways that doharm than good He writes in depth about four compelling case examples the rise of anorexia in Hong Kong, the wave that brought PTSD to Sri Lanka, the shifting nature of schizophrenia in Zanzibar, and the mega marketing of depression i A wonderful book for those interested in how culture influences mental health Ethan Watters crafts a strong argument against how the western world s imperialism dismisses other people s diverse lived experiences, medicalizing their struggles in ways that doharm than good He writes in depth about four compelling case examples the rise of anorexia in Hong Kong, the wave that brought PTSD to Sri Lanka, the shifting nature of schizophrenia in Zanziba...

  2. matt says:

    Kudos to my friends on goodreads who feel inspired enough to write full fledged reviews I simply can t muster the energy However, this book enraged me in a way few do and I feel compelled to share at least some of my thoughts Watters caught my attention with the pot shots he threw at the DSM in the NYT magazine earlier this year and I approached the book with cautious optimism Crazy Like Us follows along the same lines as his initial article, providing four examples of what anyone who has Kudos to my friends on goodreads who feel inspired enough to write full fledged reviews I simply can t muster the energy However, this book enraged me in a way few do and I feel compelled to share a...

  3. Kater Cheek says:

    I read a lot of books about psychology and mental illness, but this book took what I already knew to a new level It discusses four different illnesses in four different cultures anorexia in Hong Kong, schizophrenia in Zanzibar, PTSD in Sri Lanka, and Depression in Japan.One of the fascinating premises promoted by this book is that when Western psychologists describe a typical wester...

  4. Kate says:

    Well, this was certainly interesting From studying anthropology to working in international public health to studying psych nursing, this is right up my alley I appreciate some of what he is trying to say, in that transcultural treatment options are often not adequately tailored to each new specific culture To some degree, I a...

  5. Anna says:

    Crazy Like Us is the most fascinating book I ve ever read about mental illness, and probably one of the best books I ve read this year I thought it would be a tough read, but found myself utterly caught up The writing is precise, thoughtful, humane, and erudite Watters thesis is that Western notions of mental illness are being exported to Africa and Asia, for intertwined reasons of profit and philanthropy, and this is changing the very nature of mental illness in the countries concerned T Crazy Like Us is the most fascinating book I ve ever read about mental illness, and probably one of the best books I ve read this year I thought it would be a tough read, but found myself utterly caught up The writing is precise, thoughtful, humane, and erudite Watters thesis is that Western notions of mental illness are being exported to Africa and Asia, for intertwined reasons of profit and philanthropy, and this is changing the very nature of mental illness in the countries concerned The book provides convincing evidence to support this thesis through four in depth case studies Each focuse...

  6. Liz says:

    So it s basically pop psychology anthropology and as such lacks a certain depth However, this is an interesting and convincing book about the cultural specificity of mental illness and the imperialism of a specifically Western, radically individualist, medical model of mental suffering I ve been pretty persuaded by the idea of symptom pools that each culture has its own pool of legible ways to express psychic distress, subconsciously taken up by sufferers since I first read about them in 200 So it s basically pop psychology anthropology and as such lacks a certain depth However, this is an interesting and convincing book about the cultural specificity of mental illness and the imperialism of a specifically Western, radically individualist, medical model of mental suffering I ve been pretty persuaded by the idea of symptom pools that each culture has its own pool of legible ways to express psychic distress, subconsciously taken up by sufferers since I first read about them in 2007 ish It s interesting to think about the ways in which speech, raising awareness can have material effects Also, and importantly, this book doe...

  7. Lynne says:

    A very readable and very interesting read I also heard the author in a radio interview you can find here It had never occurred to me that HOW mental illness and distress expresses itself is very tied in to one s culture, so that the same event a flood, a death, whatever requires different treatment, ritual, etc depending on one s c...

  8. Lorin Kleinman says:

    A woman tries to walk across a room, but collapses Another suddenly goes blind, for no obvious physical reason Victorian hysteria, clearly a product of a time when women lived highly constricted, repressed lives A veteran suffering from PTSD, on the other hand doubtless a real disease, immutable, applicable in all situations and cultures Not so, says Ethan Watters, who convincingly argues that all mental illnesses are circumscribed and molded by the cultures in which they occur A person wh A woman tries to walk across a room, but collapses Another suddenly goes blind, for no obvious physical reason Victorian hysteria, clearly a product of a time when women lived highly constricted, repressed lives A veteran suffering fr...

  9. Bryan Kibbe says:

    This book offers a fascinating series of accounts of how Western i.e American, European understandings of mental health have and are being exported to cultures throughout the world, often in ways that are profoundly at odds with deep cultural practices and traditions that understand the mind in fundamental different ways Watters in engaging narrative form, carefully chronicles the rise of anorexia in Tokyo, PTSD in Sri Lanka, schizophrenia in Zanzibar, and depression in Japan At the heart o This book offers a fascinating series of accounts of how Western i.e American, European understandings of mental health have and are being exported to cultures throughout the world, often in ways that are profoundly at odds with deep cultural practices and traditions that understand the mind in fundamental different ways Watters in engaging narrative form, carefully chronicles the rise of anorexia in Tokyo, PTSD in Sri Lanka, schizophrenia in Zanzibar, and depression in Japan At the heart of Watters ...