Helen in Egypt

!!> Read ➵ Helen in Egypt  ➸ Author H.D. – Johndore.co.uk
  • Paperback
  • 304 pages
  • Helen in Egypt
  • H.D.
  • English
  • 27 September 2018
  • 0811205444

About the Author: H.D.

Is a well-known author, some of his books are a fascination for readers like in the Helen in Egypt book, this is one of the most wanted H.D. author readers around the world.


Helen in Egypt The Fabulous Beauty Of Helen Of Troy Is Legendary But Some Say That Helen Was Never In Troy, That She Had Been Conveyed By Zeus To Egypt, And That Greeks And Trojans Alike Fought For An Illusion A Fifty Line Fragment By The Poet Stesichorus Of Sicily C 640 555 B.C , What Survives Of His Pallinode, Tells Us Almost All We Know Of This Other Helen, And From It H D Wove Her Book Length Poem Yet Helen In Egypt Is Not A Simple Retelling Of The Egyptian Legend But A Recreation Of The Many Myths Surrounding Helen, Paris, Achilles, Theseus, And Other Figures Of Greek Tradition, Fused With The Mysteries Of Egyptian Hermeticism.

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10 thoughts on “Helen in Egypt

  1. Jonfaith says:

    Why must you recallthe white fire of unnumbered stars,rather than that single taperburning in an onyx jar This is a tale of veils and ramparts, the gaze of the author and perhaps a refracted mirror of personal mental matters drifting awry Helen in Egypt is a palimpsest, a blotted scribbling a flight from Troy to the darkened cults of Osiris I kept heeding Doolittle s advice and pleaded incessantly aloud to learn how not to remember Time adds folds and our persistent treading leaves torn san Why must you recallt...

  2. Miriam says:

    In deceptively simple phrases, Doolittle builds an evercomplex structure of themes, symbols and stories.Helen is on Leuke, or in Egypt, or perhaps Troy Or is she anywhere at all Perhaps she is dead she died, or seemed to die As an entirety it made the most sense to me if interpreted as a liminal experience at the point of death, or in a transitional state from life to death All the places, times, people compressed into one timeless instance of experience, change, knowledge, unknowing In deceptively simple phrases, Doolittle builds an evercomplex structure of themes, symbols and stories.Helen is on Leuke, or in Egypt, or perhaps Troy Or is she anywhere at all Perhaps she is dead she died, or seemed to die As an entirety it made the most sense to me if interpreted as a liminal experience at the point of death, or in a transitional state from life to death All the places, times, people compressed into one timeless instance of experience, change, knowledge, unknowing So many contradictions and retractions, conflations and reinterpretationsBut if this is the experience of death, must it not be Helen s death And who is Helen As in mythology, she remains a cipher, the catalyst and pivot of so many events, actions, stories, feelings yet somehow herself unreal, blank For this reason I was never able to care much about Helen, or Achilles e...

  3. Kathline says:

    Hilda Doolittle s interpretive version of Stesichorus poem Pallinode tells a new version of Helen and Achilles superimposed over a fabric of mythologies Each section begins with a meditation in prose, followed by verse written in tercets The writing is dense, erudite and beautifully crafted in terms of language and music The prose serves as a kind of introduction but isof a primer The information in the prose passage and the poem overlaps, interlocks yet this preparatory lead in asks Hilda Doolittle s interpretive version of Stesichorus poem Pallinode tells a new version of Helen and Achilles superimposed over a fabric of mythologies Each section begins with a meditation in prose, followed by verse written in tercets The writing is dense, erudite and beautifully crafted in terms of language and music The prose serves as a kind of introduction but isof a primer The information in the prose passa...

  4. Jim says:

    This is my first encounter with H.D s work This is an imaginative, deep meditation of Helen and her meaning s in Greek mythology Inspired by a passage in the Pallinode of Stesichorus, H.D asks the question, What if Helen never made it to Troy What if the Greeks and Trojans fought over an illusion To fully appreciate this poem, you should have some familiarity with Greek mythology At a minimum, you should know The Iliad Also helpful would be The Odyssey, The Oresteia, Sophocles Three T...

  5. l. says:

    and the anger of Pariswas only a breath to fan the flameof thoughts too deep to remember that break through the elgend,teh fame of Achilles, the beauty of Helen,like firethrough the broken pictureson a marble floor t...

  6. Jenny says:

    HD s modern interpretation of the story of Helen of Troy reminded me of Ursula Le Guin s version of Lavinia In both, we are introduced to a famous woman who is most often portrayed as an archetype, known for her influence on famous men and historical events, rather than for her own thoughts and achievements.HD explores Helen and the events surrounding the Trojan War in a combination of prose and poetry HD explores the same story from different points of view, changing facts, rearranging the ti HD s modern interpretation of the story of Helen of Troy reminded me of Ursula Le Guin s version of Lavinia In both, we are introduced to a famous woman who is most often portrayed as an archetype, known for her influence on famous men and historical events, rather tha...

  7. aPriL does feral sometimes says:

    Although individual lines are lovely off the tongue, the poem for my taste is 280 pages too long I read this as a Brain Pain book club read and it drags on and on and on to my admittedly poetry illiterate mind Hundreds of pages go on repeating the same dozen telephone book entries of gods, goddesses and heroes in a monotonous laundry list that literally goes on for hundreds of lines I thought the printer made a mistake and was repeating pages, but no , while throughout the poem there is no d Although individual lines are lovely off the tongue, the poem for my taste is 280 pages too long I read this as a Brain Pain book club read and it drags on and on and on to my admittedly poetry illiterate mind Hundreds of pages go on repeating the same dozen telephone book entries of gods, goddesses and heroes in a monotonous laundry list that literally goes on for hundreds of lines I thought the printer made a mistake and was repeating pages, but no , while throughout the poem there is no drama or movement or intention of any kind Three hundred pages of disassociated angst where everyone repeats over and over, stanza following stanza, who am I, when am I, where am I Everybody can t remember if they were in Troy or not, killed or not, alive or not The gods can t keep their identities clear in their minds either, con...

  8. Hesper says:

    I needed to take a breather and walk off the urge for something like a post coital cigarette before writing a review because the only thing I could think of after I finished was, Oh My God And I rarely get religious over anything.Not that I am significantlycoherent now reading this was that kind of experience but at least I can string some sentences together, and they amount to thisthan any other literary form, the enjoyment of poetry is subjective to the point of being absur I needed to take a breather and walk off the urge for something like a post coital cigarette before writing a review because the only thing I could think of after I finished was, Oh My God And I rarely get religious over anything.Not that I am significantly...

  9. Mitch says:

    Not my favorite HD book, but an interesting book Read in conjunction with the novel, Bid Me To Live, I read a lot of HD s personal life into the poem whether it all belonged there or not Once heard a tape of HD reading from this, and behind the corny cadenc...

  10. Mike says:

    I read somewhere that one of H.D s purposes in writing this was to have it serve as an answer to Pound s Cantos It doesn t really, but it is reminiscent of the Cantos in that it has a lot of exceptional beauty buri...