The Cygnus Mystery: Unlocking the Ancient Secret of Life's Origins in the Cosmos

KINDLE ❅ The Cygnus Mystery: Unlocking the Ancient Secret of Life's Origins in the Cosmos Author Andrew Collins – Johndore.co.uk
  • Hardcover
  • 368 pages
  • The Cygnus Mystery: Unlocking the Ancient Secret of Life's Origins in the Cosmos
  • Andrew Collins
  • English
  • 12 March 2018
  • 1842932020

About the Author: Andrew Collins

Is a well-known author, some of his books are a fascination for readers like in the The Cygnus Mystery: Unlocking the Ancient Secret of Life's Origins in the Cosmos book, this is one of the most wanted Andrew Collins author readers around the world.


The Cygnus Mystery: Unlocking the Ancient Secret of Life's Origins in the CosmosThe Cygnus Constellation Is The Key To Unlocking Humanity S Ancient And Universal Belief That Life Originated In The Heavens And Will Ultimately Return There Best Selling Author Andrew Collins Has Found That This Long Held Conviction Emerges From An Astronomy That Is About 17,000 Years Old, With Standing Stones, Temples, And Monuments Across The Globe Orientated Towards Cygnus S Stars He Also Discovered That The Use Of Deep Caves By Palaeolithic Man Was Crucial To The Rise Of Religious Thought And The Belief In Life S Stellar Origins Modern Day Technology Has Now Confirmed The Existence Of High Energy Particles In These Caves Particles That Come From A Binary Star Known As Cygnus X3 These Ancient People Already Knew What Science Is Finally Confirming That The DNA Of Life Came Originally From Deep Space.

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10 thoughts on “The Cygnus Mystery: Unlocking the Ancient Secret of Life's Origins in the Cosmos

  1. Vrinda Pendred says:

    This book was mostly brilliant, but I ve had to shave a star off my rating due to the ending In summary, this is an exploration of the prevalence of traditions relating to swans, geese and other such birds, still alive today, but dating back thousands of years In addition, it is about the very probable link between these traditions and a fixation with the constellation Cygnus the swan , made apparent in the mythology of ancient peoples, as well as the alignments of numerous ancient megalith This book was mostly brilliant, but I ve had to shave a star off my rating due to the ending In summary, this is an exploration of the prevalence of traditions relating to swans, geese and other such birds, still alive today, but dating back thousands of years In addition, it is about the very probable link between these traditions and a fixation with the constellation Cygnus the swan , made apparent in the mythology of ancient peoples, as well as the alignments of numerous ancient megaliths around the globe.It is a tremendously fascinating subject that had me hooked right from the start The author makes a very convincing argument that the Cygnus tradition dates back to some long lost belief system from the so called hunter gatherer era, and that our ancestors believed the birds carried our souls to the afterlife, through a hole at the top of the sky the pole star region I could not begin to summarise all the evidence Collins presents for this theory He has clearly done his research.That said, I questioned whether, at times, he lost sight of the forest for the trees For example, the book is split into different global regions, and when it hit the India section, he spent a great deal of time focusing on the cult of Saraswati I appreciate that she rides a swan However, I thoughtcould have been made of her consort, Brahma Let s bear in mind that Brahma is said to be the creator of the material universe, and yet he only gets a page in this book He, too, rides a swan More than that, he has 4 heads Cygnus is a cross with 4 points He was born of Vishnu s naval Cygnus crosses over the constellation Aquila, which is an eagle, and Vishnu happens to ride the eagle Garuda Vishnu also lies on an ocean of milk Aquila lies on the Milky Way, in our sky Siva rides a bull surely this means Taurus He has a son who is taken up into the sky to become the 7th star in the Pleiades the Pleiades are part of Taurus I don t think one needs to go into much esoteric detail to convince someone that Brahma must represent Cygnus, bearing in mind all the other obvious astronomical symbolism in these stories and yet none of this is mentioned in the book As I say, Collins instead focuses on Saraswati, and spends a great deal of time discussing the now extinct Saraswati river, northerly orientation, etc It s all very interesting, but I was surprised to see he d overlooked the obvious in the first place The India section was also very short compared to other world regions, something I didn t understand, as I know for a fact there is so muchin there to support Collins argument.Then we get to the ending, which frankly confused me The last 50 pages suddenly switched into a discussion about mushroom cults, radiation beaming down from Cygnus, and the notion that atoms in our bodies might communicate with each other I m not going to get into whether I believe or agree with any of these things My main issue is that none of it tied together I couldn t understand what any of it really had to do with what he d said in the previous 300 pages of the book It didn t strike me as a valid conclusion It feltlike he d worked out that everyone once worshipped the constellation Cygnus, and he needed to come up with some reason why but he couldn t, so he started throwing tons of unrelated theories on the page and finished without really saying anything.Actually, theI think about the ending, theI think perhaps I ought to down rate the book again, to 3 stars But I think that would do it a disservice, because up until those final 50 pages, this truly was a fascinating book I personally think perhaps the way to read this book is to get very involved in it and then stop as soon as he says, Now let me tell you why our ancestors were so interested in Cygnus Because he doesn t really know Maybe no one ever will If Collins is right, this dates back to a time of which we have no written record Perhaps the fun of this book is to come up with your own theories as to why they would have been so fascinated with that constellation in particular In that sense, I recommend it Just, as I say, maybe take the last 50 pages with a pinch of salt

  2. David Roberts says:

    The book I read to research this post was The Cygnus Mystery by Andrew Collins which is an excellent book which I bought from kindle This book starts off about the Dogon People in Mali who since ancient times and as part of their beliefs claim people came from the star we call Sirius in the Cygnus of which the Sun is part of Anyway they knew there was 3 stars as part of what to the naked would be perceived as one star and this wasn t confirmed by the scientific world until the 1980 s They als The book I read to research this post was The Cygnus Mystery by Andrew Collins which is an excellent book which I bought from kindle This book starts off about the Dogon People in Mali who since ancient times and as part of their beliefs claim people came from the star we call Sirius in the Cygnus of which the Sun is part of Anyway they knew there was 3 stars as part of what to the naked would be perceived as one star and this wasn t confirmed by the scientific world until the 1980 s They also worshipped a star we call Deben and claim when you die your body is taken somewhere in that constellation to start a new life The constellation Cygnus is of course so named because it resembles a swan and there is strong beliefs among many ancient peoples that swans are special and that they bring spirits to our world obviously because they travel far when they migrate but Andrew argues could this belief have something to do with spacemen actually coming from this region of space The idea we have that storks allegedly deliver babies may come from this belief There is also what maybe circumstantial evidence that comets and meteors colliding with the Earth may have brought life here in ancient times and that there may have been some life on Mars even if only in the form of bacteria Many ancient sites like Avebury Stonehenge among others were aligned to these stars albet as well as others and of course there primary function appears to have been identifying the times to do things like plant crops A lot of these kinds of sites were built around the same time even in widely different locations Andrew tends to do books that look at ancient history and argue that ancient peoples may have beenadvanced than we realize as well as looking at strange phenomena I really enjoyed reading this book and I can tell by all the places he said he visited that he has gone to a lot of trouble to research it According to this book also ancient peoples were may bein contact which each other than what we realize although maybe sporadically

  3. Gyrus says:

    Falls apart slightly towards the end, but the bulk is fascinating speculation on the role of the polar stars in myth and prehistory Cracking good travel reading

  4. Elentarri says:

    Well written, interesting book.PS No bloody aliens in space ships Thank the Valar.

  5. Michelle Snyder says:

    The history is well researched and documented If you stick to the history in this book you will get good information.

  6. Bryan Day says:

    READ IT

  7. Steven says:

    Some interesting ideas, but I thought big parts were clutching at straws

  8. David Carr says:

    Some parts of this book was difficult to make it through but the information was very interesting and worth the read.