The Hall of a Thousand Columns

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      The Hall of a Thousand Columns
 ↠ young readers ✓ Book Publishing – johndore.co.uk
  • Paperback
  • 352 pages
  • The Hall of a Thousand Columns
  • Tim Mackintosh-Smith
  • English
  • 05 August 2017
  • 0719565871

About the Author: Tim Mackintosh-Smith

Is a well-known author, some of his books are a fascination for readers like in the The Hall of a Thousand Columns book, this is one of the most wanted Tim Mackintosh-Smith author readers around the world.



      The Hall of a Thousand Columns
Born in 1304, Ibn Battutah left his native Tangier as a young scholar of law over the 30 years that followed he visited most of the known world between Morocco and China In this enchanting travelogue, Tim Mackintosh Smith retraces one leg of the Moroccan s journey the dizzy ladders and terrifying snakes of his Indian career as a judge and hermit, courtier and prisoner, ambassador and castaway From the plains of Hindustan to the plateaus of the Deccan and the lost ports of Malabar, an India far off the beaten path of Taj and Raj glittering and grotesque but genuine is revealed here. New Download eBook The Hall of a Thousand Columns Author Tim Mackintosh-Smith – johndore.co.uk

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10 thoughts on “ The Hall of a Thousand Columns

  1. Daren says:

    This is a re read of this book, the second of the trilogy, as I have recently obtained a copy of the third book My original review remains below, and I am just adding a few comments and a quotation , rather than revamping the entire review.My second reading of this did not perhaps stand up to the scrutiny so well as the original it is perhaps on balance 3.5 stars, but I am ok with rounding that back up to 4 as previous.I mentioned in my review of Travels with a Tangerine A Journey in the Fo This is a re read of this book, the second of the trilogy, as I have recently obtained a copy of the third book My original review remains below, and I am just adding a few comments and a quotation , rather than revamping the entire review.My second reading of this did not perhaps stand up to the scrutiny so well as the original it is perhaps on balance 3.5 stars, but I am ok with rounding that back up to 4 as previous.I mentioned in my review of Travels with a Tangerine A Journey in the Footnotes of Ibn Battutah, that it was quite a self indulgent book I am of the same conclusion here The author follows his own path with the narrative, swerving wildly where it suits him T...

  2. John says:

    Author certainly has a way with words puns that might be come off as over the top from others work brilliantly here Terrific overview of current, and historical India, but, I d recommend reading Tangerine first if possible for context.

  3. Sajith Kumar says:

    Making history was a favourite pastime of Indian rulers, but writing it was never even a hobby As the Hindu rulers fell one by one against the invading Islamic might, things changed Muslim nobles and courtiers produced journals and panegyrics of their patrons This was a period in which travelers through the land recorded their observations Ibn Battutah 1304 69 was a noted Moroccan religious scholar and world traveler, who visited India during the reign of Muhammed Shah Tughluq and stayed Making history was a favourite pa...

  4. Anna Brunskill says:

    It s taken me forever to get round to reading this follow up travelogue from Tim Mackintosh Smith, the author of the marvellous Travels With A Tangerine, but I m so glad I did The author has a beautiful way with language, as well as a dry sense of humour and a knack of observing the little details that bring a rich, vibrant quality to his tales I found this book harder going than his travels round Arabia and the Levant I rather suspect this was the case both for the author and for Ibn Battuta It s taken me forever to get round to reading this follow up travelogue from Tim Mackintosh Smith, the author of the marvellous Travels With A Tangerine, but I m so glad I did The author has a beautiful way with language, as well as a dry sense of humour and a knack of observing the little details that bring a rich, vibrant quality to his tales I found this book harder going than his ...

  5. Sundeep Mallya says:

    Ibn Batutah, the famous fourteenth century traveller, left an extensive travelogue of his travels However, by his own account, he was writing out of memory, since his notes of his travels were lost on his return journey as were all the treasures and memorabilia he had collected over the 3o years of his travels The author of this book, retraces, IB s journey, or rather parts of it and not always in the same direction.Unlike kings and emperors who left many monuments, inscriptions etc of thei Ibn Batutah, the famous fourteenth century traveller, left an extensive travelogue of his travels However, by his own account, he was writing out of memory, since his notes of his travels were lost on his return journey as were all the treasures and memorabilia h...

  6. Meo says:

    Another book which took a long time to read in this case, it was not a chore but a pleasure Tim Mackintosh Smith travels through India, searching for fragments, signs and stories in modern times which echo those seen and recorded four hundred years ago by Moroccan traveller Ibn Battutah IB spent many years in India, some of the time as a legal advisor to a mad Sultan, other times as an exile and at the end trying to travel to China on the Sultan s behalf Drifting lazily through this book Another book which took a long time to read in this case, it was not a chore but a pleasure Tim Mackintosh Smith travels through India, searching for fragments, signs and stories in modern times which echo those seen and recorded four hundred years ago by Moroccan traveller Ibn Battutah IB spent many years in India, some of the time as a legal advisor to a ma...

  7. Elizabeth says:

    I wanted to like this book a lot better than I did Travels with a Tangerine A Journey in the Footnotes of Ibn Battutah is absolutely phenomenal and one of my all time favorites And this installment has a lot of the same charms as ever, Mackintosh Smith is quick to relate a hilarious story, to make an obscure but pleasing reference Much to my delight, he never hesitates to make the shift, in his own words, from chic to s But for some reason it didn t have the same drive and energy I found I wanted to like this book a lot better than I did Travels with a Tangerine A Journey in the Footnotes of Ibn Battu...

  8. Joe says:

    Now the Hall of a Thousand Turds The palace of the book s title has become an al fresco lavatory or was in the early 1990s when it was written Mackintosh Smith continues his journey in the footsteps of the 14th century traveller Ibn Battutah Here he is in India in an often Quixotic search for fragments usually architectural and cultural relating to Ibn Battutah s passing It s also very much a travelogue about modern India A learned book without being difficult or stuffy and the gags a Now the Hall of a Thousand Turds The palace of the book s title has become an al fresco lavatory or was in the early 1990s when it was written Mackintosh Smith continues his journey in the footsteps of the 14th century traveller Ibn Battutah Here he is in India in an often Quixotic search for fragments usually architectural and cultural relating to Ibn Battutah s passing It s also very much a travelogue about modern India A learned book without being difficult or stuffy and the gags and a...

  9. Vivian says:

    I live in Egypt, but picked this book up because of a recent trip to India I was quickly hooked on both Ibn Battutah and Tim MacIntosh Smith Every Egyptian I have mentioned this to knows of Ibn Battutah, regardless of their economic or educational level ...

  10. Andrea Leber says:

    Interesting book, but I found the author s contempt for Hinduism disturbing However, as Mackintosh himself writes, the Indian shelves of my own library are meagre Maybe his perspective isn t that surprising ...