Honor Killing

[PDF / Epub] ☉ Honor Killing  Author David E. Stannard – Johndore.co.uk
  • Hardcover
  • 466 pages
  • Honor Killing
  • David E. Stannard
  • English
  • 24 February 2019
  • 0670033995

About the Author: David E. Stannard

Is a well-known author, some of his books are a fascination for readers like in the Honor Killing book, this is one of the most wanted David E. Stannard author readers around the world.


Honor Killing In The Fall Of , Thalia Massie, The Bored, Aristocratic Wife Of A Young Naval Officer Stationed In Honolulu, Accused Six Non White Islanders Of Gang Rape The Ensuing Trial Let Loose A Storm Of Racial And Sexual Hysteria, But The Case Against The Suspects Was Scant And The Trial Ended In A Hung Jury Outraged, Thalia S Socialite Mother Arranged The Kidnapping And Murder Of One Of The Suspects In The Spectacularly Publicized Trial That Followed, Clarence Darrow Came To Hawai I To Defend Thalia S Mother, A Sorry Epitaph To A Noble CareerIt Is One Of The Most Sensational Criminal Cases In American History, Stannard Has Rendered Than A Lurid Tale One Hundred And Fifty Years Of Oppression Came To A Head In Those Sweltering Courtrooms In The Face Of Overwhelming Intimidation From A Cabal Of Corrupt Military Leaders And Businessmen, Various People Involved With The Case The Judge, The Defense Team, The Jurors, A Newspaper Editor, And The Accused Themselves Refused To Be Cowed Their Moral Courage United The Disparate Elements Of The Non White Community And Galvanized Hawai I S Rapid Transformation From An Oppressive White Run Oligarchy To The Harmonic, Multicultural American State It BecameHonor Killing Is A Great True Crime Story Worthy Of Dominick Dunne Both A Sensational Read And An Important Work Of Social History

You may also like...

10 thoughts on “Honor Killing

  1. George says:

    I really enjoyed reading this book Even though I knew how it turned out, before I opened the cover for the first time Honor Killing is so very well written and very well researched, that you really get a feel for time and place and people many appalling people.Bryan Burrough, coauthor of Barbarians at the Gate and author of Public Enemies, says it best in his back cover blurb First rate history that works as true crime thriller and as a social and political history Few books make me I really enjoyed reading this book Even though I knew how it turned out, before I opened the cover for the first time Honor Killing is so very well written and very well researched, that you really get a feel for time and place and people many appalling people.Bryan Burrough, coauthor of Barbarians at the Gate and author of Public Enemies, says it best in his back cover blurb First rate history that works as true crime thriller and as a social and political history Few books make me genuinely angry, but this one did Anger is justified at the incredible miscarriage of justice portrayed in this true story Injustice, both criminal and social Stannard paints a wrenching picture of the insidious effects of the waning white military colonialism that beset the Territory of Hawaii during the first half of the twentieth century, and of its impact on real people and cultures.And no people, unfortunately, werereal, too real, than that sorrowful, despicable excuse for a young woman Thalia Massie I m not one to ever applaud suicide, but I could truly wish that hers had come some thirty years sooner What a waste of a person And I can t think too muchkindly of her mom Recommendation A riveting, page turner says the Chicago tribune For all who enjoy their reading real, up close and personal Also recommended, with reference to this same tragedy Rape in Paradise, by Theon Wright Honolulu a novel by Alan Brennert and The Massie Affair American Experience a PBS Home Video, available from Netflix

  2. Patiki says:

    I have mixed feelings about this book As malihini, I appreciated the history and the cultural analysis As a former victim advocate and current prosecutor, I found some of the book annoying Basically, it s the story of how a Caucasian woman accused local men of rape, and how that accusation was probably untrue, but a race based prosecution ensued My main problem with the book is how the author could have made his point by exposing the bad police work suggestive ID, violating witness exclusio I have mixed feelings about this book As malihini, I appreciated the history and the cultural analysis As a former victim advocate and current prosecutor, I found some of the book annoying Basically, it s the story of how a Caucasian woman accused local men of rape, and how that accusation was probably untrue, but a race based prosecution ensued My main problem with the book is how the author could have made his point by exposing the bad police work suggestive ID, violating witness exclusionary rule, etc But he goes beyond that and pushes some rape myths Regardless of whether local men raped the woman, the undisputed fact is that she was found by the side of the road in the wee early morning hours with a bloody face Maybe she did blame the assault on local men out of racism, but the fact is someone beat her Anyway, in an attempt to expose the racism of the ensuing rape prosecution, the author has to make the case that the alleged rapists were innocent So the author does what every defense lawyer does in every sex assault trial hates on the woman described as a physically disabled, ugly, fat stupid drunk slut with mental problems The main man alleged to have raped her, on the other hand, is this noble athlete who previously had a different girl as in, underage accuse him of rape but that accusation was totally false, too, because she was a slut, just like the woman who accused him later was a slut.So you can see why the book is annoying Instead of exposing a racist prosecution by relying on the bad police work, the author throws in a bunch of victim blaming A better story would have been, somebody bloodied up this woman, and she couldn t report the real perpetrator because he was probably Caucasian and powerful, so she blamed local men for rape

  3. Paul Jr. says:

    As today 1 8 2010 marks the 78th anniversary of the murder of Joseph Kahahawai, I ve edited this to bump this amazing book up.I ve been vaguely aware of the Massie Affair for a couple of years now, but it wasn t until I d read Alan Brennert s novel Honolulu that I d decided it was a piece of history I should knowabout In his novel, Brennert weaves elements of the Massie Affair into the narrative and makes Joseph Kahahawai one of the men falsely accused of rape in that case a charact As today 1 8 2010 marks the 78th anniversary of the murder of Joseph Kahahawai, I ve edited this to bump this amazing book up.I ve been vaguely aware of the Massie Affair for a couple of years now, but it wasn t until I d read Alan Brennert s novel Honolulu that I d decided it was a piece of history I should knowabout In his novel, Brennert weaves elements of the Massie Affair into the narrative and makes Joseph Kahahawai one of the men falsely accused of rape in that case a character in his story After meeting Joseph in that novel, I decided that it was time I delve into the details of this dark piece of Hawaiian history Brennert referenced David Stannard s Honor Killing and so I picked it up and am I glad I did.Honor Killing tells the story of five men Joseph Kahahawai, Horace Ida, Ben Ahakuelo, Henry Chang and David Takai who are accused and tried of raping Thalia Massie, a white woman and navy wife, even though they could not as trial evidence later revealed have committed the crime When that trial ends in a mistrial, Tommie Massie and his mother in law Grace Fortescue and two other navy men kidnap Kahahawai and murder him, a crime for which they are convicted and sentenced to 10 years hard labor Their convictions, however, were commuted by the governor to one hour served in the comfort of the Governor s office.Yes, this is a non fiction work, but it isn t some dry, scholastic recitation of events long gone by It is a fascinating and expertly crafted read that really pulls the reader in to the time and place, and Stannard manages to do something that is not all that easy to do in non fiction he takes a story to which one already knows the ending and makes it not only readable, but compelling every step of the way And he does this with an even hand He doesn t embellish the facts or sensationalize the events He keeps the eye of a researcher and historian firmly in place.With meticulous care, Stannard not only builds Hawaii of that time, but he also gives life, depth and most importantly context to the social and political situations that existed in 1930s Honolulu Stannard doesn t just rely on society pages and newspaper accounts or the memoirs of those who prosecuted the falsely accused or those who defended Tommie Massie and Grace Fortescue who killed Kahahawai He digs deeper, constructing full people, both their faults and foibles for public and private records In this expert historical study, each person we are introduced to is built from the events and experiences which brought them to the particular place in their lives Using their own words, the inconsistencies in their own statements, the recollections of others as well as detailed trial transcripts, Stannard creates full people He doesn t give us cardboard villains or angelic heroes The Honolulu of the age is painted as it was a Paradise, that is if your were one of the privileged white haole, and a tough, poor neighborhood if you were of Native Hawaiian or Asian descent.In the end, Stannard delivers not only an important piece of Hawaiian history, but of U.S history, a history that should be taught in all American schools It s a study of classism, colonialism, and racism And Stannard manages all this in a riveting yet scholarly manner Highly recommended

  4. Melinda Elizabeth says:

    David Stannards book about a case that struck at the heart of Hawaii and left a scar on the community, has perhaps had a resurgence in recent months due to a podcast called Offshore Correlating the similarities between a present day case of a haole from the armed services being involved in the killing of a local Hawaiian man, Offshore leans heavily on Stannard s book in order to shed some light on contemporary Hawaii But back to the book There is a lot of care taken to explain annexation, t David Stannards book about a case that struck at the heart of Hawaii and left a scar on the community, has perhaps had a resurgence in recent months due to a podcast called Offshore Correlating the similarities between a present day case of a haole from the armed services being involved in the killing of a local Hawaiian man, Offshore leans heavily on Stannard s book in order to shed some light on contemporary Hawaii But back to the book There is a lot of care taken to explain annexation, the colonisation of Hawaii and the changes to the landscape when haole men took over In the 30 s, there was still a very strong trade influence, and white men held all the power.The Massies were a burden on society before they ever made it to Hawaii When they got there, things only got worse In an astonishing case of hysteria, Thalia Massie manages to whip up a frenzy across the ocean, when her femininity, and her good standing as a woman is apparently taken away by local Hawaiian men One shouldn t be surprised But there s no attempt to make things right, to at least conceal the very clear racism and vigilantism that occurred in this case Flying in high profile lawyer Clarence Darrow to help fix the mess they found themselves in, the Massies maintain their societal freedoms, and the real victims are left to live with a shame that they will never be rid of It s a long book There s a lot of law to ing and fro ing It delves into historical facts about Hawaii that are really interesting to read I think that Stannard has written a comprehensive book about this particular crime in Hawaii and it was thoroughly interesting

  5. Rachel says:

    In 1931, Thalia Massie, the young wife of a Navy lieutenant stationed at Pearl Harbor, accused five local men of dragging her into a car, repeatedly raping her, and dumping her on the side of the road Although all the men had solid alibis, Thalia s own doctor found no evidence of rape, and even law enforcement officials came to believe that she had fabricated the story, the effort to prosecute the men was spearheaded by Admiral Stirling Yates, commandant of the 14th Naval District, and Walter D In 1931, Thalia Massie, the young wife of a Navy lieutenant stationed at Pearl Harbor, accused five local men of dragging her into a car, repeatedly raping her, and dumping her on the side of the road Although all the men had solid alibis, Thalia s own doctor found no evidence of rape, and even law enforcement officials came to believe that she had fabricated the story, the effort to prosecute the men was spearheaded by Admiral Stirling Yates, commandant of the 14th Naval District, and Walter Dillingham, a wealthy and politically influential businessman Their main interest was not in obtaining justice for Thalia rather, they wanted to use the case to convince the federal government to establish a commission form of government in the then territory of Hawaii, strip non white residents of Hawaii of their U.S citizenship, and ensure that power remained with The Big Five, a group of sugarcane processing corporations who dominated in Hawaii politics In addition to pursuing prosecution, a media campaign extended to the mainland press, claiming the Massie case was merely one of dozens of assaults on white, American womanhood perpetrated by local men When the rape case against the five men Horace Ida, David Takai, Henry Chang, Ben Ahakuelo, and Joseph Kahahawai resulted in a hung jury and mistrial, Thalia s husband Tommie, her mother Grace Fortescue, and two other Navy seamen, kidnapped and murdered Joseph Kahahawai The evidence against them was, to put it mildly, overwhelming, beginning with the fact that they were in a car with Kahahawai s dead body when they were stopped by police The defense, led by Clarence Darrow in a sadly ironic end to his career, and the media argued that the murder of Kahahawai was an honor killing, justified by the racially mixed jury s unwillingness to convict Kahahawai and the others of rape In a compromise verdict, the jury in the murder case convicted Fortescue, Massie, and their two co conspirators of manslaughter with a recommendation for leniency Initially sentenced to the mandatory ten years in prison, territorial Governor Lawrence Judd, under pressure from President Hoover, commuted their sentences to one hour in the custody of the sheriff, with twenty minutes credit for time served Many in the white community were outraged that they weren t given full pardons.Stannard s thesis is that the Massie trials transformed Hawaii and unseated the white oligarchy, but his argument for this is fairly thin He discusses how the plantation owners would pit their workers against each other by ethnicity, sometimes favoring Japanese over Chinese or Chinese over Filipino in terms of wages and working conditions and then randomly reversing course, in an effort to prevent them from joining forces and unionizing, a result of which was that there was a lot of ethnic prejudice among the different Asian workers Stannard posits that as a result of the blatant anti Asian and anti Hawaiian sentiment displayed by the white minority in power during the time of the two criminal trials that the different groups came to findcommon ground amongst themselves He states, a line was being drawn that signaled an emerging interracial and inter ethnic unity of consciousness among Hawaii s various people of color whose mutual antagonisms, initially bestowed on them and nurtured by plantation overseers, had for so long kept them apart But see, no While plantation owners no doubt exploited and exacerbated the inter ethnic conflict, they didn t bestow it Asia has an entire history of conflict separate and apart from the early 20th century sugar cane industry in Hawaii Stannard also cites as evidence of this new inter ethnic unity, the development of a single panethnic Creole that linguistically united the separate Pidgin dialects This argument doesn t even make sense Pidgin develops as a way for people who speak different languages to be able to communicate with each other and it becomes an established creole dialect once its syntactical structure arises People who speak different languages don t just decide to linguistically unite, call it a creole, and then use it to talk about Whitey Stannard did a lot of research, but it wouldn t have killed him to spend an hour talking to a linguist.Nonetheless, as to research and as a history of the two trials, this is as complete an account as possible Stannard liststhan 2000 written sources and also interviewed family members of many of the people involved in the two trials all of the major players themselves being deceased Stannard s writing style is a little dry, however, and so even though the story itself is fascinating in an awful kind of way, there were times when I found myself a little bored with all of the detail The book was published on the same day that PBS aired The Massie Affair and the filmmakers and Stannard shared research, but while I would recommend the PBS program to the general viewer, I think the book would probably be a little much unless someone was interested in the history of Hawaii

  6. Nicholas says:

    This was pretty fantastic, almost a perfect case study for how to write a micro history of one event that is incredibly rich in context, while also just riveting in its particulars In 1931, navy wife and East Coast society daughter Thalia Massie, stationed with her husband in Honolulu, accuses five non white men of gang rape Despite the fact that the evidence indicates they could not possibly have committed the crime indeed that no crime at all may have been committed they are all put on tri This was pretty fantastic, almost a perfect case study for how to write a micro history of one event that is incredibly rich in context, while also just riveting in its particulars In 1931, navy wife and East Coast society daughter Thalia Massie, stationed with her husband in Honolulu, accuses five non white men of gang rape Despite the fact that the evidence indicates they could not possibly have committed the crime indeed that no crime at all may have been committed they are all put on trial Despite extreme pressure to convict by white elites, the trial results in a hung jury Taking matters into their own hands, Thalia s mother who had come to Honolulu to be by her side during the trial , husband, and two other navy officers kidnap and murder Joe Kahahawai, one of the men Thalia had accused They are immediately caught trying to dispose of the body and put on trial Oh, and in his last courtroom appearance, a cash strapped Clarence Darrow gives up on all of his progressive ideals and agrees to defend the lynchers The entire Massie Affair both trials and their aftermath, which I won t reveal here for those who might want to read captured the attention of the entire world Darrow s closing arguments even went live on the radio across the US The whole sordid, rage inducing affair serves as a pretty phenomenal window into Hawaiian social and political history of the era, and indeed of the years since Stannard is a historian who has written a number of academic books before, but here he uses his training to provide the context and then tells a totally fascinating story of crime, lies, race, betrayal, and courtroom drama Along the way are true acts of courage by people who had lots to lose I bought this a few years ago and then never actually read it I m so glad I finally decided to do so Just stellar

  7. Lizzie says:

    This is a fascinating book about the 1931 Massie affair in which a white Navy wife accused a group of islanders of rape Navy and business people acted swiftly to try to railroad the alleged rapists, with help from the conservative press, but the prosecution couldn t succeed in getting the jury to convict Mrs Massie s mother and some sailors who worked for the Massies then kidnapped and killed on of the accused rapists Clarence Darrow came from the mainland to defend them, arguing that there i This is a fascinating book about the 1931 Massie affair in which a white Navy wife accused a group of islanders of rape Navy and business people acted swiftly to try to railroad the alleged rapists, with help from the conservative press, but the prosecution couldn t succeed in getting the jury to convict Mrs Massie s mother and some sailors who worked for the Massies then kidnapped and killed on of the accused rapists Clarence Darrow came from the mainland to defend them, arguing that there is a higher law that allows a husband to execute his wife s rapist.I love this kind of history he describes Hawaii and its politics at the time, and goes into the background of every character in this story I d known the history of how Hawaii was taken over by American businesses but hadn t realized the extent to which the Navy controlled things, too.Stannard argues that this case was the beginning of a liberal trend in Hawaii, as Hawaiians, Japanese, Chinese, and mixed people came together to support each other and fight discrimination After the Massie case unions began to organize as mixed race groups and conservatives were voted out and replaced by liberals.It s a terrific history and an absorbing mystery

  8. Claire says:

    This is textbook materialpeople need to know about this case and the role of colonization and every ism you can think of in Hawaii Less focus on Pearl Harbor and hula dance classes, please If you ve spent time in Waikiki, this ll be a definite eye opener as you see familiar street names

  9. Jeff Murphy says:

    Great depiction of how this event and it s contributing circumstances help shape the original melting pot of Hawaii.

  10. Merty says:

    A must read, I loved this book One sees how it was back then and how things were covered up Makes one appreciate Hawaii and how people all live in this melting pot of different cultures.